gemma

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gem·ma

(jem'ă),
Any budlike or bulblike body, especially a taste bud or end bulb.
[L. bud]

gemma

(jĕm′ə)
n. pl. gemmae (jĕm′ē′) Botany
An asexual budlike propagule capable of developing into a new individual, as in liverworts.

gemma

[jem′ə] pl. gemmae
Etymology: L, bud
1 also called gemmule. a budlike projection produced by some organisms during budding, a type of asexual reproduction.
2 any budlike or bulblike structure, such as a taste bud or end bulb. gemmaceous, adj.

gemma

(pl. gemmae) a small group of cells that serves as a means of vegetative reproduction in some mosses and liverworts. These cells become detached from the main THALLUS and often occur in cup-like structures referred to as gemma-cups. Each gemma is capable of developing into a new plant.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Huperzia, whenever present, gemmae were collected and established using the protocol outlined in the "Huperzia Gemmae Propagation" section (Fig.
An efficient regeneration pattern via gemmae for Huperzia serrata (Thunb.
Thus the gemmae leaves are here described as if viewed from above or below and the terms "abaxial" and "adaxial" are used in relation to the axis of the gemma.
We examined 1103 gemmae from 150 specimens (Appendix 1) from the following herbaria: ALA, GH, NY, VT and WTU.
Further examination of the Steep Lake specimen (Gerdes 6938, MIN) revealed aspects of the positioning and morphology of the short shoots that suggest that they were essentially gemmae that had failed to differentiate during development.
Also, the homology of the short shoots with gemmae was suggested by slight differentiation of leaf shape of the proximal leaves and by a reduction in the number of orthostichies in which the proximal leaves are inserted (Fig.
The gametophyte and gemmae are more tolerant of desiccation or freezing than are the sporophytes of other taxa in Trichomanes and Vittaria (Farrar, 1985).
Since dispersal of gemmae is greatly restricted, the present geographical ranges of these two species indicate dispersal by spores when sporophytes were present.
We focused on the potential value of gemmae for propagation during the survey.
Vittariod gametophytes are easily identifiable give there unusual morphology and gemmae production.
Type II gametophytes have indeterminate growth and branching and type III gametophytes combine type II growth with production of dispersible gemmae.