geminate

(redirected from geminates)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

geminate

 [jem´ĭ-nāt]
paired; occurring in twos.

gem·i·nate

(jem'i-nāt),
Occurring in pairs.
Synonym(s): geminous
[L. gemino, pp. -atus, to double, fr. geminus, twin]

geminate

/gem·i·nate/ (jem´ĭ-nāt) paired; occurring in twos.

gem·i·nate

(jem'i-năt)
Occurring in pairs.
[L. gemino, pp. -atus, to double, fr. geminus, twin]

gem·i·nate

(jem'i-năt)
Occurring in pairs.
[L. gemino, pp. -atus, to double, fr. geminus, twin]

geminate

paired; occurring in twos.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some speakers tended to lengthen long geminates considerably and thereby shorten the S4 vowel.
It is added only after a singular participle (M or F); -n is geminate before a vowel, single before a consonant: (4)
40) Since all of the substantives in (12) involve weak roots, it seems more likely that they result from root variation between geminate and Ill-weak roots.
Once such geminates are followed by a plosive in the onset, they are simplified to a single segment (cf.
General gemination occurs in all Ingrian dialects; the geminates resulting from general gemination are either full-length or short-initial.
a > o and simplification of geminates in Turoyo/Mlahso) or mergers (e.
Several consonants in the Woleaian inventory change in quality when geminated; singleton l geminates as nn, g as kk, r and g as cc, and [beta] as bb.
In addition, geminates, if sporadically, occupy positions in which etymological reasons exclude the shortness of the preceding vowel (cf.
the opposition involves single consonants and geminates.
Most of the roots listed either reflect geminates, roots containing a glide or guttural, and roots containing a sonorant (pp.
Indeed, the presence of medial geminates appears to be a powerful attractor for infant attention, since children target a disproportionate number (49%, compared to an incidence in mothers' content words of 37%) (Vihman and Velleman 2000).
Most members of the last generation of speakers of the dialect had substituted long geminates for single stops in corresponding inflectional paradigms and similar unalternating geminates occur in North-East Estonian.