gelation


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Related to gelation: gelation time

gelation

 [jĕ-la´shun]
conversion of a sol into a gel.

ge·la·tion

(jĕ-lā'shŭn),
1. In colloidal chemistry, the transformation of a sol into a gel.
2. The solidification of a liquid by cold temperatures.

gelation

/ge·la·tion/ (jĕ-la´shun) conversion of a sol into a gel.

gelation

The process of forming a gel by cooling or freezing.

ge·la·tion

(jĕ-lā'shŭn)
colloidal chemistry The transformation of a solution into a gel.

gelation

conversion of a sol into a gel.
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References in periodicals archive ?
An Arrhenius model is mostly used to predict the gelation behavior of cross-linked network [13].
If the water amount of the postaddition (v) increased, gelation tended to be occurred.
Without the addition of a processing aid, gelation occurred in some beverages after one week at room temperature.
The activation energy of gelation reflects the effect of the alumina nanoparticles on rheological properties as well as the formation of a cross-linked network.
Two recent studies by scientists at the University of Wisconsin highlighted the importance of the state of the casein micelles during the initial rennet gelation stage, and show how they affect the functional properties of cheese.
DMDEE, a high-boiling tertiary amine with a balanced reactivity to blowing and gelation reactions.
This is because of the gelation of alginate solutions at very low polymer concentrations (e.
Gelation characteristics can then be optimized for specific applications, such as for controlling texture in fermented dairy products or for trapping bacteria to protect sensitive cultures.
Actually, from the view point of material properties, it is significant to control the reactive processing conditions, that is, the balance between gelation process and monomer polymerization.
DMDEE is a high-boiling tertiary amine with a balanced reactivity to blowing and gelation reactions.
Given the above mentioned complexities, knowledge of the instance of gelation at different processing conditions, as well as monitoring the evolution of morphology during the dynamic vulcanization are important.
This book presents the latest research findings on food hydrocolloids, covering polysaccharide characterisation and gelation, interactions in mixed biopolymer systems, the behaviour of polysaccharides in high solid systems and the influence of proteins on emulsification.