gelatin

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gelatin

 [jel´ah-tin]
a substance obtained by partial hydrolysis of collagen derived from skin, white connective tissue, and bones of animals; used as a suspending agent, in manufacture of capsules and suppositories, sometimes as an adjuvant protein food, and suggested for use as a plasma substitute. In absorbable film and sponge, it is used in surgical procedures.
zinc gelatin a preparation of zinc oxide, gelatin, glycerin, and purified water, used as a topical skin protectant. See also Unna's paste boot.

gel·a·tin

(jel'ă-tin),
A derived protein formed from the collagen of tissues by boiling in water; it swells when put in cold water, but dissolves only in hot water; used as a hemostat, plasma substitute, and protein food adjunct in malnutrition.
[L. gelo, pp. gelatus, to freeze, congeal]

gelatin

/gel·a·tin/ (jel´ah-tin) a substance obtained by partial hydrolysis of collagen derived from skin, white connective tissue, and bones of animals; used as a suspending agent, in manufacture of capsules and suppositories, sometimes as an adjuvant protein food, and suggested for use as a plasma substitute.
zinc gelatin  a preparation of zinc oxide, gelatin, glycerin, and purified water, used as a topical skin protectant.

gelatin

also

gelatine

(jĕl′ə-tn)
n.
a. A colorless or slightly yellow, transparent, brittle protein formed by boiling the specially prepared skin, bones, and connective tissue of animals and used in foods, drugs, and photographic film.
b. Any of various similar substances.

gel·a·tin

(jel'ă-tin)
A derived protein formed from the collagen of tissues by boiling in water; it swells up when put in cold water, but dissolves only in hot water; used as a hemostat, plasma substitute, and protein food adjunct in the treatment of malnutrition. It is also used in the manufacture of capsules.
[L. gelo, pp. gelatus, to freeze, congeal]

gelatin

denatured collagen which forms a transparent jelly-like substance.

gel·a·tin

(jel'ă-tin)
Derived protein formed from collagen of tissues by boiling in water; it swells when put in cold water, but dissolves only in hot water; used as a hemostat.
[L. gelo, pp. gelatus, to freeze, congeal]

gelatin,

n a protein formed from collagen by boiling in water. Medically, gelatin is used as a hemostat, a plasma substitute, and a protein food adjunct in severe cases of malnutrition. Gelatin is used in the manufacture of capsules and suppositories. It is also used in the production of radiographic films as the medium for suspending the crystal salts on the surface of the acetate film.

gelatin

a substance obtained by partial hydrolysis of collagen derived from skin, white connective tissue, and bones of animals; used as a suspending agent for various drugs or in manufacture of capsules and suppositories; suggested for intravenous use as a plasma substitute, and has been used as an adjuvant protein food. In absorbable film and sponge, it is used in surgical procedures.

gelatin digestion test
a tube test for the presence of fecal proteases; used in the diagnosis of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.
gelatin liquefaction test
a biochemical test used for the identification of several bacterial species. Detects the ability of the organism to produce substances which hydrolyze gelatin.
gelatin sponge
a spongy form of denatured gelatin, soaked with thrombin and used as a hemostatic.
zinc gelatin
a preparation of zinc oxide, gelatin, glycerin and purified water, applied topically as a protective.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gelatin applications estimated and forecasted in this study include food & beverage, nutraceuticals, pharmaceuticals, photography, cosmetics and others (industrial, medical, matchstick and paintball).
The scientists concluded that the warm-water fish gelatins could be used nearly in every market sector as an alternative to the gelatin sourced from pigs and cattle.
GLOBAL GELATIN TRADE II-56 Table 18: Leading Exporters of Gelatin and Gelatin Derivatives Worldwide (2013): Percentage Share Breakdown of Export Value by Country (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) II-56 Table 19: Leading Importers of Gelatin and Gelatin Derivatives Worldwide (2013): Percentage Share Breakdown of Export Value by Country (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) II-56
Dr Mark Dyas, senior lecturer in pharmaceutical sciences at Liverpool John Moores University, says that the results of studies carried out by his team, indicate that fish gelatin might prove to be a useful replacement for mammalian products.
MARKET DRIVERS, TRENDS & ISSUES II-9 Applications in the Pharmaceutical Industry: A Strong Growth Driver II-9 Table 5: Global Market for Pharmaceuticals (2012): Percentage Share Breakdown of Value Sales by Medication Class (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) II-10 Ageing Demographics to Drive Demand for Gelatin Coated Drugs and Supplements II-10 Table 6: Elderly Population (65+ Years) as a Percentage of the Total Population: 2000 & 2025 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) II-11
Products containing animal- or plasma-derived proteins, such as gelatin and albumin, respectively, have the potential to induce harmful inflammatory or immune responses in humans and pose risk of contamination with potentially life-threatening pathogens, such as viruses or prions.
Table 3: Gelatin Production Capacity of Leading Players (2012) II-4 Production Scenario by Geographic Region II-4 Table 4: Global Gelatin Production (in '000 Tonnes) by Geographic Region: 2012 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) II-4 Rising Gelatin Prices: A Major Concern II-5 Rousselot Announces Increase in Prices II-5 Rising Prices Lead Confectioners to Opt for Cost-effective Starch Alternatives II-6 New Yogurt Stabilizers to Tackle Gelatin Price Rise II-6 Gelatin Regulations in a Nutshell II-7 Gelatin Pharmacopoeia - At a Glance II-7 Edible Gelatin Regulations II-8 2.
to establish the feasibility of producing high-quality recombinant gelatin in alfalfa factories.
Table 16: World 15-Year Perspective for Gelatin by GeographicRegion - Percentage Breakdown of Unit Consumption for US,Canada, Japan, Europe, Asia-Pacific (excluding Japan), LatinAmerica and Rest of World Markets for Years 2004, 2013 and2018 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) II-69
FibroGen is eager to advance its work in producing a family of safe synthetic gelatins through a strong and productive partnership with Aventis Pasteur," said Thomas B.
The availability of synthetic versions of authentic human collagen and gelatins has been long-desired by pharmaceutical and medical device companies anxious to eliminate the issues associated with the use of bovine- and porcine-derived products, such as unacceptable endotoxin levels and exposure to pathogenic bacteria and viruses.
SeeNews) - Feb 3, 2014 -A Belgian TessenderloA (EBR:TESB) will restructure its gelatin plants worldwide, which will lead to 23 job losses in its PB Gelatins division in Vilvoorde, chemicals group's spokeswoman Kathleen Iwens said Monday, quoted by news agency Belga.