gelatin

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gelatin

 [jel´ah-tin]
a substance obtained by partial hydrolysis of collagen derived from skin, white connective tissue, and bones of animals; used as a suspending agent, in manufacture of capsules and suppositories, sometimes as an adjuvant protein food, and suggested for use as a plasma substitute. In absorbable film and sponge, it is used in surgical procedures.
zinc gelatin a preparation of zinc oxide, gelatin, glycerin, and purified water, used as a topical skin protectant. See also Unna's paste boot.

gel·a·tin

(jel'ă-tin),
A derived protein formed from the collagen of tissues by boiling in water; it swells when put in cold water, but dissolves only in hot water; used as a hemostat, plasma substitute, and protein food adjunct in malnutrition.
[L. gelo, pp. gelatus, to freeze, congeal]

gelatin

/gel·a·tin/ (jel´ah-tin) a substance obtained by partial hydrolysis of collagen derived from skin, white connective tissue, and bones of animals; used as a suspending agent, in manufacture of capsules and suppositories, sometimes as an adjuvant protein food, and suggested for use as a plasma substitute.
zinc gelatin  a preparation of zinc oxide, gelatin, glycerin, and purified water, used as a topical skin protectant.

gelatin

also

gelatine

(jĕl′ə-tn)
n.
a. A colorless or slightly yellow, transparent, brittle protein formed by boiling the specially prepared skin, bones, and connective tissue of animals and used in foods, drugs, and photographic film.
b. Any of various similar substances.

gel·a·tin

(jel'ă-tin)
A derived protein formed from the collagen of tissues by boiling in water; it swells up when put in cold water, but dissolves only in hot water; used as a hemostat, plasma substitute, and protein food adjunct in the treatment of malnutrition. It is also used in the manufacture of capsules.
[L. gelo, pp. gelatus, to freeze, congeal]

gelatin

denatured collagen which forms a transparent jelly-like substance.

gel·a·tin

(jel'ă-tin)
Derived protein formed from collagen of tissues by boiling in water; it swells when put in cold water, but dissolves only in hot water; used as a hemostat.
[L. gelo, pp. gelatus, to freeze, congeal]

gelatin,

n a protein formed from collagen by boiling in water. Medically, gelatin is used as a hemostat, a plasma substitute, and a protein food adjunct in severe cases of malnutrition. Gelatin is used in the manufacture of capsules and suppositories. It is also used in the production of radiographic films as the medium for suspending the crystal salts on the surface of the acetate film.

gelatin

a substance obtained by partial hydrolysis of collagen derived from skin, white connective tissue, and bones of animals; used as a suspending agent for various drugs or in manufacture of capsules and suppositories; suggested for intravenous use as a plasma substitute, and has been used as an adjuvant protein food. In absorbable film and sponge, it is used in surgical procedures.

gelatin digestion test
a tube test for the presence of fecal proteases; used in the diagnosis of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.
gelatin liquefaction test
a biochemical test used for the identification of several bacterial species. Detects the ability of the organism to produce substances which hydrolyze gelatin.
gelatin sponge
a spongy form of denatured gelatin, soaked with thrombin and used as a hemostatic.
zinc gelatin
a preparation of zinc oxide, gelatin, glycerin and purified water, applied topically as a protective.
References in periodicals archive ?
These gelatin sticks were stolen from Neji power plant on July 20.
Melting points of gelatins from goat skin with various pretreatments were found in the range of 33.
Investigators also added the antibacterial enzyme lysozyme to gels and films made from fish-based gelatins.
Experiments led by agricultural engineer Roberto de Jesus Avena-Bustillos, formerly with McHugh's group and now a collaborator based at the University of California-Davis, showed that the fish-derived gelatin films serve as a protective barrier against the damaging effects of moisture and oxygen.
FibroGen Europe continues to make significant progress toward the commercialization of human recombinant collagen and gelatin, products with multiple applications in medical device and pharmaceutical product markets that total more than $2 billion ($US) worldwide.
Sugar-free gelatins have been on the market for close to three years now," says General Foods' Fennell.
High quality, low-endotoxin gelatin manufactured from alkaline treated porcine skin with a variety of potential applications in the fields of regenerative medicine, medical Low-Endotoxin Gelatin devices and scientific research.
Cod skin gelatin (CSG) and pork skin gelatin (PSG) were used as standards.
Gelatin - End Use Applications II-25 Major Applications and Functions for Gelatin by Category Type II-26 Food II-26 Functional Characteristics of Gelatins in Food II-27 Dairy Products II-28
The scientists extracted the gelatins from both warm-water fish--tilapia and tuna--and cold-water fish--cod, megrim and hake.
They are studying the formation and structure of different mammalian and fish gelatin gels; examining the functional properties of different mammalian and fish gelatins; evaluating the structure-function relationship of gelatins; making and evaluating blends of the new gelatins and commercial gelatins; and modeling functional properties.
5 kDa recombinant gelatin, which has completed human safety testing demonstrating its suitability for use in drug delivery.