gelatin

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gelatin

 [jel´ah-tin]
a substance obtained by partial hydrolysis of collagen derived from skin, white connective tissue, and bones of animals; used as a suspending agent, in manufacture of capsules and suppositories, sometimes as an adjuvant protein food, and suggested for use as a plasma substitute. In absorbable film and sponge, it is used in surgical procedures.
zinc gelatin a preparation of zinc oxide, gelatin, glycerin, and purified water, used as a topical skin protectant. See also Unna's paste boot.

gel·a·tin

(jel'ă-tin),
A derived protein formed from the collagen of tissues by boiling in water; it swells when put in cold water, but dissolves only in hot water; used as a hemostat, plasma substitute, and protein food adjunct in malnutrition.
[L. gelo, pp. gelatus, to freeze, congeal]

gelatin

/gel·a·tin/ (jel´ah-tin) a substance obtained by partial hydrolysis of collagen derived from skin, white connective tissue, and bones of animals; used as a suspending agent, in manufacture of capsules and suppositories, sometimes as an adjuvant protein food, and suggested for use as a plasma substitute.
zinc gelatin  a preparation of zinc oxide, gelatin, glycerin, and purified water, used as a topical skin protectant.

gelatin

also

gelatine

(jĕl′ə-tn)
n.
a. A colorless or slightly yellow, transparent, brittle protein formed by boiling the specially prepared skin, bones, and connective tissue of animals and used in foods, drugs, and photographic film.
b. Any of various similar substances.

gel·a·tin

(jel'ă-tin)
A derived protein formed from the collagen of tissues by boiling in water; it swells up when put in cold water, but dissolves only in hot water; used as a hemostat, plasma substitute, and protein food adjunct in the treatment of malnutrition. It is also used in the manufacture of capsules.
[L. gelo, pp. gelatus, to freeze, congeal]

gelatin

denatured collagen which forms a transparent jelly-like substance.

gel·a·tin

(jel'ă-tin)
Derived protein formed from collagen of tissues by boiling in water; it swells when put in cold water, but dissolves only in hot water; used as a hemostat.
[L. gelo, pp. gelatus, to freeze, congeal]

gelatin,

n a protein formed from collagen by boiling in water. Medically, gelatin is used as a hemostat, a plasma substitute, and a protein food adjunct in severe cases of malnutrition. Gelatin is used in the manufacture of capsules and suppositories. It is also used in the production of radiographic films as the medium for suspending the crystal salts on the surface of the acetate film.

gelatin

a substance obtained by partial hydrolysis of collagen derived from skin, white connective tissue, and bones of animals; used as a suspending agent for various drugs or in manufacture of capsules and suppositories; suggested for intravenous use as a plasma substitute, and has been used as an adjuvant protein food. In absorbable film and sponge, it is used in surgical procedures.

gelatin digestion test
a tube test for the presence of fecal proteases; used in the diagnosis of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.
gelatin liquefaction test
a biochemical test used for the identification of several bacterial species. Detects the ability of the organism to produce substances which hydrolyze gelatin.
gelatin sponge
a spongy form of denatured gelatin, soaked with thrombin and used as a hemostatic.
zinc gelatin
a preparation of zinc oxide, gelatin, glycerin and purified water, applied topically as a protective.
References in periodicals archive ?
Japan), The Reinert Group (Germany), Ewald-Gelatine GmbH (Germany), Trobas Gelatine B.
stir from time to time then remove, stir in the gelatine mixture and continue to stir constantly for a couple of minutes until well blended.
Meanwhile, soak the gelatine leaves in cold water until softened.
Regulatory Environment II-37 GME Standards II-37 Europe- Facing Regulatory Threat II-37 Impact Extends to the US II-38 New EU Legislation II-38 EU Regulations: Edible Gelatin II-38 EU Regulations: Pharmaceutical Gelatin II-38 Gelatine (Intra-Community Trade) (Wales) Regulations 2001 II-39
Easy to dissolve and to use, EmuIsiGel[TM] is the perfect gelatine for the dressings and sauces industry.
Whereas you need to 'sponge' powdered gelatine in a small amount of liquid which is a bit of a nuisance to put it mildly, with leaf gelatine you just soften it in cold water for five minutes, wring it out in your hands and add it to the warmed liquid or mixture that you want to set, and hey presto
Cut gelatine into pieces and place in heatproof bowl.
According to the company, gelatine is the second most used food ingredient in the world.
Market Analysis III-59 Outlook III-59 Spanish Market for Health and Wellness Products: A Macro Perspective III-59 Junca Gelatines S.
The first is that it's pale in colour, and the second is that too much may stop the gelatine working.
Rousselot, the world's leading producer of gelatine and hydrolyzed collagen, announces the reorganization of its gelatine range within two main product lines: Rousselot[R] Functionality and Rousselot[R] Reformulation.
Rousselot, the world's leading gelatine and collagen peptides producer, will be at the forthcoming CPhI show held October 9[sup.