gelatin


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

gelatin

 [jel´ah-tin]
a substance obtained by partial hydrolysis of collagen derived from skin, white connective tissue, and bones of animals; used as a suspending agent, in manufacture of capsules and suppositories, sometimes as an adjuvant protein food, and suggested for use as a plasma substitute. In absorbable film and sponge, it is used in surgical procedures.
zinc gelatin a preparation of zinc oxide, gelatin, glycerin, and purified water, used as a topical skin protectant. See also Unna's paste boot.

gel·a·tin

(jel'ă-tin),
A derived protein formed from the collagen of tissues by boiling in water; it swells when put in cold water, but dissolves only in hot water; used as a hemostat, plasma substitute, and protein food adjunct in malnutrition.
[L. gelo, pp. gelatus, to freeze, congeal]

gelatin

/gel·a·tin/ (jel´ah-tin) a substance obtained by partial hydrolysis of collagen derived from skin, white connective tissue, and bones of animals; used as a suspending agent, in manufacture of capsules and suppositories, sometimes as an adjuvant protein food, and suggested for use as a plasma substitute.
zinc gelatin  a preparation of zinc oxide, gelatin, glycerin, and purified water, used as a topical skin protectant.

gelatin

also

gelatine

(jĕl′ə-tn)
n.
a. A colorless or slightly yellow, transparent, brittle protein formed by boiling the specially prepared skin, bones, and connective tissue of animals and used in foods, drugs, and photographic film.
b. Any of various similar substances.

gel·a·tin

(jel'ă-tin)
A derived protein formed from the collagen of tissues by boiling in water; it swells up when put in cold water, but dissolves only in hot water; used as a hemostat, plasma substitute, and protein food adjunct in the treatment of malnutrition. It is also used in the manufacture of capsules.
[L. gelo, pp. gelatus, to freeze, congeal]

gelatin

denatured collagen which forms a transparent jelly-like substance.

gel·a·tin

(jel'ă-tin)
Derived protein formed from collagen of tissues by boiling in water; it swells when put in cold water, but dissolves only in hot water; used as a hemostat.
[L. gelo, pp. gelatus, to freeze, congeal]

gelatin,

n a protein formed from collagen by boiling in water. Medically, gelatin is used as a hemostat, a plasma substitute, and a protein food adjunct in severe cases of malnutrition. Gelatin is used in the manufacture of capsules and suppositories. It is also used in the production of radiographic films as the medium for suspending the crystal salts on the surface of the acetate film.

gelatin

a substance obtained by partial hydrolysis of collagen derived from skin, white connective tissue, and bones of animals; used as a suspending agent for various drugs or in manufacture of capsules and suppositories; suggested for intravenous use as a plasma substitute, and has been used as an adjuvant protein food. In absorbable film and sponge, it is used in surgical procedures.

gelatin digestion test
a tube test for the presence of fecal proteases; used in the diagnosis of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.
gelatin liquefaction test
a biochemical test used for the identification of several bacterial species. Detects the ability of the organism to produce substances which hydrolyze gelatin.
gelatin sponge
a spongy form of denatured gelatin, soaked with thrombin and used as a hemostatic.
zinc gelatin
a preparation of zinc oxide, gelatin, glycerin and purified water, applied topically as a protective.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using gelatin as a plasma expander was not associated with an increase in mortality when compared to other types of intravenous fluids when all strata of different types of alternative fluids were pooled together (OR 1.
The disappearance of beads and the significant decrease in the fiber diameter might be referred to the comparative decrease in the interactions between chitosan and gelatin and increase in the available salt formation sites (amino group of gelatin as well as chitosan).
In e-mail correspondence, Miriam Wudowsky of the OK kosher certifying agency said, "Kosher gelatin is made from kosher fish and/or agar agar.
Table 34: US Long-term Projections for Gelatin by End Use Applications- Food & Beverage, Pharmaceuticals, Photographic Supplies and Others Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption Figures in Metric Tons for Years 2011 through 2015 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) III-8
This research analyzes and estimates the performance and production of gelatin in the global scenario, providing detailed trend analysis of the market by geography and comprehensive analysis of companies that are dealing in gelatin.
The gelatin hydrolysates obtained from gelatin types 225B40 and 100B40, which were processed at 37 C for 30 minutes, at pH 7.
Not only does sheet gelatin come in different varieties with differing weights respectively, but it also is available in different sized sheets, adding to the confusion.
STRAWBERRY STABILIZED CREAM: Follow directions for Stabilized Whipped Cream, adding 1/3 cup seedless strawberry jelly to the gelatin mixture instead of 1/4 cup half-beaten cream.
When the ingredients are combined and heated, these weak bonds break, and the long gelatin molecules slide over one another and mix with the other ingredients.
Gelatin is most common material used for making drug capsules.
In the Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfurt, Gelatin lured the visitor across a narrow ceiling-high bridge to face a daredevil climbing experience: in the Milan gallery Massimo de Carlo they installed a terrifically fast roller coaster for visitors' use; and in Vienna they opened a semipublic bathhouse.