gaze

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gaze

 [gāz]
1. to look in one direction for a period of time.
2. the act or state of looking steadily in one direction.

gaze

(gāz),
The act of looking steadily at an object.

gaze

(gāz)
1. to look steadily in one direction.
2. the act of looking steadily at something.

conjugate gaze  the normal movement of the two eyes simultaneously in the same direction to bring something into view.

gaze

[gāz]
Etymology: ME, gazen, to stare
a state of looking in one direction. A person with normal vision has six basic positions of gaze, each determined by control of different combinations of contractions of extraocular muscles. See also cardinal position of gaze.

gaze

To fixate steadily or continuously. See cardinal positions of gaze.
References in periodicals archive ?
Look at a gazing globe and you'll have a fish-eye view of everything except what's directly behind the globe.
In Experiment 2, we attempted to confirm whether the gaze cue used in Experiment 1 actually directed observers' attention to the gazing location.
Also, we will define and evaluate effective gazing interactions which substitute many kinds of convenient interaction scheme used in touch based interface.
It's a must see for all those interested in star gazing - offering people a great opportunity to learn more about star gazing equipment and astronomy.
They sit this way, gazing at one another, for two hours.
The study involved presenting still images of faces as cue stimuli; these stimuli included neutral and emotional (happy, angry, and fearful) faces gazing right, left, or straight ahead.
It's particularly disturbing when the man you're talking to is just gazing down at your top rather than looking you in the eye.
sitting on chairs calmly watching the approach of the fire" or "standing in the street, motionless, gazing at the clouds of smoke"
For example, currently underway is a follow-up to a study that established that nonpredictive gaze direction cues can trigger an attention shift even when participants are unaware of having seen a gazing face.
By these calculations, the software may opt to interrupt a person if he is gazing out the window but not if he is briefing the CEO.
Laura Mulvey has famously posited that, when gazing at women on the screen, male spectators escape their fear of lack of the phallus--their fear of castration--by either voyeurism or "the substitution of a fetish object" (438).
Nevertheless, reflecting on the gaze rather than on the people gazing can be useful.