gaze

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gaze

 [gāz]
1. to look in one direction for a period of time.
2. the act or state of looking steadily in one direction.

gaze

(gāz),
The act of looking steadily at an object.

gaze

(gāz)
1. to look steadily in one direction.
2. the act of looking steadily at something.

conjugate gaze  the normal movement of the two eyes simultaneously in the same direction to bring something into view.

gaze

[gāz]
Etymology: ME, gazen, to stare
a state of looking in one direction. A person with normal vision has six basic positions of gaze, each determined by control of different combinations of contractions of extraocular muscles. See also cardinal position of gaze.

gaze

To fixate steadily or continuously. See cardinal positions of gaze.
References in periodicals archive ?
John Paulin Hansen of the Technical University of Denmark in Lyngby, who is currently developing drones that follow a controller's gaze, thinks a system like this is an obvious candidate for operating a robot.
Pre-service teachers searched for these gazes when engaging with the selected popular culture narratives of abuse and webs of deceit that permeated our community.
Third, the presentation of contrasting gazes by setting up mainstream versus social/online and populist media gazes provides opportunities to understand the existence and significance of the gaze from marginalized groups.
This style gives individuals the ability to identify the media gaze at work in their everyday lives and extends the reader's learning process well beyond the completion of the book.
The imperial gaze reflects the assumption that the white western subject is central much as the male gaze assumes the centrality of the male subject.
The ability to orient attention rapidly according to the gaze of others confers an evolutionary advantage in that it enables detection of biologically significant stimuli (Emery, 2000).
Povinelli of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette argues that Flombaum and Santos show only that monkeys avoid a competitor's gaze, not that they make assumptions about what others see.
Crew catalogue, as well as, of course, "the male gaze.
But what is uncontestable is that any strategic definition of the patriarchy brings with it the right to impose a masculinist gaze of the universe and to expect that all will conform to that gaze, all will acquiesce to it, and all will, if only passively, agree to abide by what it confirms and what it disqualifies.
Yet, as it is presented in this early scene, the connection between race and the gaze is also a mystery, a riddle.
Within the framework of the clinical encounter, several literary examples of problematic "ordinary" and "scientific" gazes are discussed below.
I want to suggest, however, that it is to one of Rossetti's much less widely known poems, the simple-sounding but intricately structured lyric, "'Reflection,"' that we should look, not only for a challenging opportunity to re-think the interrelated questions of subjectivity, gender ideology, and epistemology raised by the gaze of the "framed" woman, but also for an opportunity to re-think Lacan's concept of "the gaze" itself, in terms of its potential historical significance for a devout Victorian poet.