gaze

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gaze

 [gāz]
1. to look in one direction for a period of time.
2. the act or state of looking steadily in one direction.

gaze

(gāz),
The act of looking steadily at an object.

gaze

(gāz)
1. to look steadily in one direction.
2. the act of looking steadily at something.

conjugate gaze  the normal movement of the two eyes simultaneously in the same direction to bring something into view.

gaze

[gāz]
Etymology: ME, gazen, to stare
a state of looking in one direction. A person with normal vision has six basic positions of gaze, each determined by control of different combinations of contractions of extraocular muscles. See also cardinal position of gaze.

gaze

To fixate steadily or continuously. See cardinal positions of gaze.
References in classic literature ?
She stole softly into the hall, and, herself invisible, gazed through the dusty side-lights of the portal at the young, blooming, and very cheerful face which presented itself for admittance into the gloomy old mansion.
And I partook of the infinite calm in which she lay: my mind was never in a holier frame than while I gazed on that untroubled image of Divine rest.
He gazed and gazed and gulped a lump down his throat and did not say a word.
Then he gazed beneath him, and what a sight met his eyes
They gazed about them with looks of uplifted pride, feeling new trust in the grim, always confident weapons in their hands.
But Ernest turned sadly from the wrinkled shrewdness of that sordid visage, and gazed up the valley, where, amid a gathering mist, gilded by the last sunbeams, he could still distinguish those glorious features which had impressed themselves into his soul.
Dame Aloise de Gondelaurier, a rich and noble woman, who held by the hand a pretty girl about five or six years of age, and dragged a long veil about, suspended to the golden horn of her headdress, halted as she passed the wooden bed, and gazed for a moment at the wretched creature, while her charming little daughter, Fleur-de-Lys de Gondelaurier, spelled out with her tiny, pretty finger, the permanent inscription attached to the wooden bed: "Foundlings.
He looked at the count, who still gazed at the spot where Pierre's face had been before he sat down.