gating mechanism

gat·ing mech·a·nism

1. occurrence of the maximum refractory period among cardiac conducting cells approximately 2-mm proximal to the terminal Purkinje fibers in the ventricular muscle, beyond which the refractory period is shortened through a sequence of Purkinje cells, transitional cells, and muscular cells; gating mechanism may be a cause of ventricular aberration, bidirectional tachycardia, and concealed extrasystoles;
2. a mechanism by which painful impulses may be blocked from entering the spinal cord. Compare: gate-control theory.

gating mechanism

1 the increasing duration of an action potential from the atrioventricular node to a point in the distal Purkinje system, beyond which it decreases.
2 a process that controls the opening and closing of cell-membrane ion channels.

gat·ing mech·an·ism

(gāt'ing mek'ă-nizm)
1. Occurrence of the maximum refractory period among cardiac conducting cells approximately 2 mm proximal to the terminal Purkinje fibers in the ventricular muscle; may be a cause of ventricular aberration, bidirectional tachycardia, and concealed extrasystoles.
2. A mechanism by which painful impulses may be blocked from entering the spinal cord.
Compare: gate-control theory
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