gatekeeper

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gate·keep·er

(gāt'kēp-ĕr),
A health care professional, typically a physician or nurse, who has the first encounter with a patient and who thus controls the patient's entry into the health care system.

gatekeeper

a health care professional, usually a primary care physician or a physician extender, who is the patient's first contact with the health care system and triages the patient's further access to the system.
Managed care
(1) A person, organization, or legislation that selectively limits access to a service; in health care, primary-care physicians—e.g., family practitioners, general practitioners, internists, paediatricians and PROs—and utilization review committees, respectively, function as direct or indirect gatekeepers
(2) A physician who manages a patient’s healthcare services, coordinates referrals, and helps control healthcare costs by screening out unnecessary services; many health plans insist on a gatekeeper’s prior approval for special services, in the absence of which the claim will not be covered
Molecular biology The initial gene mutated in a ‘cascade’ of mutations, leading to the development of a disease

gatekeeper

Managed care
1. A person, organization, or legislation that selectively limits access to a service; in health care, primary-care physicians–eg family practitioners, general practitioners, internists, pediatricians and PROs and utilization review committees, respectively, function as direct or indirect gatekeepers.
2. Care coordinator A physician who manages a Pt's healthcare services, coordinates referrals and helps control healthcare costs by screening out unnecessary services; many health plans insist on a gatekeeper's prior approval for special services or the claim will not be covered.

gate·keep·er

(gāt'kēp-ĕr)
A health care professional, typically a physician or nurse, who has the first encounter with a patient and who thus controls the patient's entry into the health care system.

gate·keep·er

(gāt'kēp-ĕr)
A health care professional, typically a physician or nurse, who has the first encounter with a patient and who thus controls patient's entry into system.
References in periodicals archive ?
It would be interesting to know what the Ascot gatemen of yore would have made of it.
He was a reliever in 2005 for the Wareham Gatemen in the Cape league.
Liverpool FC are also providing stewards and gatemen as part of their LFC in the Community programme, and the LSL would like to thank the Liverpool County FA and Liverpool FC for their cooperation in ensuring that the league's 50th anniversary celebrations are conducted in the highest profile.
The unofficial story, as seen by the spectators and the gatemen, is of an unseemly struggle by the well-to-do of Warwickshire out of the ground in the pouring rain on the second day and back in again towards the end of third.
WHILE Ascot still let you in if you were not so attired, it made you wear an orange sticker to denote your state of undress and so that the gatemen or stewards did not repeatedly stop people every time they went into the premier enclosure.
Membership subscriptions rose by pounds 49,926 to pounds 609,815 with the two big increases in expenses down to increased gatemen and attendants in the four floodlit games - a pounds 36,836 increase, and an extra pounds 65,000 spent on coaching, the indo or schools and trials.
Kate Hills, PR director for Folkestone's owner Arena Leisure, said yesterday: "Everyone from the gatemen to valets is looking forward to giving Mike Smith a big welcome.
Full body-suits similar to the Bugs Bunny outfits seen at Edgbaston are also banned for "safety" considerations while those outfits deemed "obscene" will be banned at the discretion of the gatemen.
HeEUROs not the one the racegoers are pointing at as they flick through their Official Raceday Programme & Form Guide (or Y Rhaglen Rasys aEUROr Canllaw Cyflwr Swyddogol, if you prefer) with raised excitement, but the gatemen show our fifth man a healthy respect and he canEUROt walk more than a few yards without receiving best wishes in a local accent.
Last year the Cumbria and Somerset final attracted 8,000 watchers and barely pai d the wages of the gatemen.
A lot of the costs for a day's racing are fairly obvious - wages for the gatemen and other casual staff, the cost of ambulances, doctors, vets and other officials, the big screen, marketing and advertising, racecards (they are free at Musselburgh), police, safety stewards, starting stalls for Flat meetings, people who work on the course during the meeting and those who repair the ground afterwards.
Would he have been so precipitate in ordering the gatemen to take out the filly and to press the starting button within a split-second if it had been either the Sir Michael Stoute or Michael Jarvis-trained runners causing the delay?