gatekeeper


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gate·keep·er

(gāt'kēp-ĕr),
A health care professional, typically a physician or nurse, who has the first encounter with a patient and who thus controls the patient's entry into the health care system.

gatekeeper

a health care professional, usually a primary care physician or a physician extender, who is the patient's first contact with the health care system and triages the patient's further access to the system.
Managed care
(1) A person, organization, or legislation that selectively limits access to a service; in health care, primary-care physicians—e.g., family practitioners, general practitioners, internists, paediatricians and PROs—and utilization review committees, respectively, function as direct or indirect gatekeepers
(2) A physician who manages a patient’s healthcare services, coordinates referrals, and helps control healthcare costs by screening out unnecessary services; many health plans insist on a gatekeeper’s prior approval for special services, in the absence of which the claim will not be covered
Molecular biology The initial gene mutated in a ‘cascade’ of mutations, leading to the development of a disease

gatekeeper

Managed care
1. A person, organization, or legislation that selectively limits access to a service; in health care, primary-care physicians–eg family practitioners, general practitioners, internists, pediatricians and PROs and utilization review committees, respectively, function as direct or indirect gatekeepers.
2. Care coordinator A physician who manages a Pt's healthcare services, coordinates referrals and helps control healthcare costs by screening out unnecessary services; many health plans insist on a gatekeeper's prior approval for special services or the claim will not be covered.

gate·keep·er

(gāt'kēp-ĕr)
A health care professional, typically a physician or nurse, who has the first encounter with a patient and who thus controls the patient's entry into the health care system.

gate·keep·er

(gāt'kēp-ĕr)
A health care professional, typically a physician or nurse, who has the first encounter with a patient and who thus controls patient's entry into system.
References in periodicals archive ?
That said, the best tool is to try to bypass the gatekeeper by calling when they're not there.
Another scenario could be when a gatekeeper grants permission for a study and later withdraws support.
Today you have to adopt new tactics for getting past the new-generation gatekeepers.
The Gatekeeper pub in Westgate Street has had its opening hours extended to 3am
Nicotine activates the gatekeeper cell, thereby prioritizing the formation of memories via local inputs.
You will stand a better chance of getting through gatekeepers if you let them help you and avoid sounding like a typical salesperson.
With our new products, we believe that we are solving a growing problem; and are very pleased and excited to make the Gatekeeper available to the Mac user community at the same price as the Windows version.
Second, I informally model Coffee's discussion of the changes in the professions that led to the wave of financial scandals and consider the implications of this analysis for determining what factors were the primary causes of gatekeeper failure.
There may be instances in which consumers favor a new product that a gatekeeper, including a pharmacist, has no interest in recommending because the product fails to provide the influencer with a perceived benefit.
Gunther also offers new Thick Film Heater technology with the Gatekeeper nozzles for molding high-temperature parts with low-shot weights (such as 0.
Little is known about whether gatekeeper requirements improve, reduce, or have no impact on quality-of-care (Bindman et al.
A cheap labor flux without the necessary quotient of fear and uncertainty imposed by illegality might cease to be cheap labor," author Mike Davis writes in the introduction to Joseph Nevins's Operation Gatekeeper.