gate

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gate

 [gāt]
1. an electronic circuit that passes a pulse only when a signal (the gate pulse) is present at a second input.
2. a mechanism for opening or closing a protein channel in a cell membrane, regulated by a signal such as increased concentration of a neurotransmitter, change in electrical potential, or physical binding of a ligand molecule to the protein to cause a conformational change in the protein molecule.
3. to open and close selectively and function as a gate.

gate

(gāt),
1. To close an ion channel by electrical (for example, membrane potential) or chemical (for example, neurotransmitter) action.
See also: cardiac gating.
2. Action of a special nerve fiber to block the transmission of impulses through a synapse, for example, gating of pain impulses at synapses in the dorsal horns.
See also: cardiac gating.
3. A device that can be switched electronically to control the passage of a signal.
See also: cardiac gating.
4. To use a physiologic signal, such as an ECG, to trigger an event such as an x-ray exposure or to partition continuously collected data.
See also: cardiac gating.
[O.E. geat]

gate

[gāt]
1 n, an electronic circuit that passes a pulse only when a signal (the gate pulse) is present at a second input.
2 n, a mechanism for opening or closing a protein channel in a cell membrane, regulated by a signal such as increased concentration of a neurotransmitter, change in electrical potential, or physical binding of a ligand molecule to the protein to cause a conformational change in the protein molecule.
3 v, to open and close selectively and function as a gate.
Cell biology A structure composed of one or more proteins that regulate passage of ions through channels in the cell membrane; gates may be chemically regulated—by neurotransmitters—or voltage regulated—in response to a threshold level of depolarization
Drug slang A regional term for Spanish heroin
Informatics An electronic circuit that performs an operation when the criteria for a logical relation—e.g., AND, or OR—are fulfilled
Immunology verb To limit the size of cells detected and their fluorescence in flow cytometry to increase the purity of cell population being analysed or sorted
Vox populi A new root form derived from the Watergate scandal which toppled the Nixon administration; -gate has been applied to various scandals. Medically-related -gates include AIDSgate and Bloodgate
References in periodicals archive ?
Speaking of gate-crashers, we know practically every one of the so-called professionals, who actually are attention-seekers and generally harmless.
A lot of money has been pumped into Jay's club, with state of the art 165in video screens, and they weren't about to take any risks with gate-crashers.
And as Martin O'Neill's men walked off the pitch like a bunch of found-out gate-crashers leaving the party, the Villa manager was left to mull over a range of issues which need to be ironed out before his team could seriously be considered as contenders to gate-crash the biggest party of them all - The Premier League top four.
Now Redcar and Cleveland Council, Cleveland Police and security advisers are trying to put a brake on the young gate-crashers.
And when The Hatters were the guests at Everton's title presentation party in 1987 they charged in like boorish, drunken gate-crashers.
But the 20-year-old was killed at a party at his flat in Cotemede on Gateshead's Leam Lane Estate in April by gate-crashers Lee Nevins and Mark Lang.
One in seven teenagers who held a party complained about gate-crashers, according to a survey of 1,100 parents and children aged between 14 and 22, by Zurich Insurance.
Organizers also promise better security than at the first two Woodstocks, which were overrun by gate-crashers.
They are in such fun-loving mood they hardly noticed the presence of the most persistent gate-crashers in football.
A judge at the High Court in London ruled that Mr Raphael's defence to the action - that the entry was created by mischievous party gate-crashers at his flat - was "built on lies".
One in seven teenagers who had held a party complained about gate-crashers, according to the survey of 1,100 parents and children aged between 14 and 22, carried out by Zurich Insurance.
Beyond that, gate-crashers like Stewart Downing and Aaron Lennon could come into the picture when Eriksson names his squad, plus probably four stand-by players.