gate


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gate

 [gāt]
1. an electronic circuit that passes a pulse only when a signal (the gate pulse) is present at a second input.
2. a mechanism for opening or closing a protein channel in a cell membrane, regulated by a signal such as increased concentration of a neurotransmitter, change in electrical potential, or physical binding of a ligand molecule to the protein to cause a conformational change in the protein molecule.
3. to open and close selectively and function as a gate.

gate

(gāt),
1. To close an ion channel by electrical (for example, membrane potential) or chemical (for example, neurotransmitter) action.
See also: cardiac gating.
2. Action of a special nerve fiber to block the transmission of impulses through a synapse, for example, gating of pain impulses at synapses in the dorsal horns.
See also: cardiac gating.
3. A device that can be switched electronically to control the passage of a signal.
See also: cardiac gating.
4. To use a physiologic signal, such as an ECG, to trigger an event such as an x-ray exposure or to partition continuously collected data.
See also: cardiac gating.
[O.E. geat]

gate

[gāt]
1 n, an electronic circuit that passes a pulse only when a signal (the gate pulse) is present at a second input.
2 n, a mechanism for opening or closing a protein channel in a cell membrane, regulated by a signal such as increased concentration of a neurotransmitter, change in electrical potential, or physical binding of a ligand molecule to the protein to cause a conformational change in the protein molecule.
3 v, to open and close selectively and function as a gate.
Cell biology A structure composed of one or more proteins that regulate passage of ions through channels in the cell membrane; gates may be chemically regulated—by neurotransmitters—or voltage regulated—in response to a threshold level of depolarization
Drug slang A regional term for Spanish heroin
Informatics An electronic circuit that performs an operation when the criteria for a logical relation—e.g., AND, or OR—are fulfilled
Immunology verb To limit the size of cells detected and their fluorescence in flow cytometry to increase the purity of cell population being analysed or sorted
Vox populi A new root form derived from the Watergate scandal which toppled the Nixon administration; -gate has been applied to various scandals. Medically-related -gates include AIDSgate and Bloodgate
References in classic literature ?
Down they charged after them, but the outlaws made good their lead, and soon got through the gate and over the bridge which had been let down by Arthur-a-Bland.
A great peacock strutted proudly across the walk before them, and, as Richard ran, childlike, after it, Lady Maud hastened on to the little postern gate which she quickly unlocked admitting her lover who had been waiting without.
As I passed the flank of the waiting green men they saw my eyes turned upon them, and in an instant, knowing that all secrecy was at an end, those nearest me sprang to their feet in an effort to cut me off before I could reach the gate.
Has an order been given to close the town gates, Monseigneur?
And so they moved down the hillside toward the gates of Manator--Tara, Princess of Helium, and Ghek, the kaldane of Bantoom--and surrounding them rode the savage, painted warriors of U-Dor, dwar of the 8th Utan of O-Tar, Jeddak of Manator.
You were ever a strange man, to whom the gates of distance are no bar.
We saw thousands emerge from this very gate, overwhelming the hordes of Torquas and putting them to rout with their deadly arrows and their fierce banths.
Humbly acquiescent, he pulled Bob back, and the gate swung shut between them.
They had covered a good portion of the distance to the gate without mishap when there came to their ears from the central portion of the city sounds of a great commotion.
From the streets beyond the high wall and the strong gate, there came the usual night hum of the city, with now and then an indescribable ring in it, weird and unearthly, as if some unwonted sounds of a terrible nature were going up to Heaven.
She at once climbed to a high tower of the royal palace and saw banners waving in every direction and the great white tent of Glinda standing directly before the gates.
Gates was a comparatively recent addition to his list of friends, a New York newspaperman who had come to England a few months before to act as his paper's London correspondent.