gate


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gate

 [gāt]
1. an electronic circuit that passes a pulse only when a signal (the gate pulse) is present at a second input.
2. a mechanism for opening or closing a protein channel in a cell membrane, regulated by a signal such as increased concentration of a neurotransmitter, change in electrical potential, or physical binding of a ligand molecule to the protein to cause a conformational change in the protein molecule.
3. to open and close selectively and function as a gate.

gate

(gāt),
1. To close an ion channel by electrical (for example, membrane potential) or chemical (for example, neurotransmitter) action.
See also: cardiac gating.
2. Action of a special nerve fiber to block the transmission of impulses through a synapse, for example, gating of pain impulses at synapses in the dorsal horns.
See also: cardiac gating.
3. A device that can be switched electronically to control the passage of a signal.
See also: cardiac gating.
4. To use a physiologic signal, such as an ECG, to trigger an event such as an x-ray exposure or to partition continuously collected data.
See also: cardiac gating.
[O.E. geat]

gate

[gāt]
1 n, an electronic circuit that passes a pulse only when a signal (the gate pulse) is present at a second input.
2 n, a mechanism for opening or closing a protein channel in a cell membrane, regulated by a signal such as increased concentration of a neurotransmitter, change in electrical potential, or physical binding of a ligand molecule to the protein to cause a conformational change in the protein molecule.
3 v, to open and close selectively and function as a gate.
Cell biology A structure composed of one or more proteins that regulate passage of ions through channels in the cell membrane; gates may be chemically regulated—by neurotransmitters—or voltage regulated—in response to a threshold level of depolarization
Drug slang A regional term for Spanish heroin
Informatics An electronic circuit that performs an operation when the criteria for a logical relation—e.g., AND, or OR—are fulfilled
Immunology verb To limit the size of cells detected and their fluorescence in flow cytometry to increase the purity of cell population being analysed or sorted
Vox populi A new root form derived from the Watergate scandal which toppled the Nixon administration; -gate has been applied to various scandals. Medically-related -gates include AIDSgate and Bloodgate
References in classic literature ?
Nothing less than the frosty light of the cheerful sky, the sight of people passing beyond the bars of the court-yard gate, and the reviving influence of the rest of the bread and meat and beer, would have brought me round.
You were ever a strange man, to whom the gates of distance are no bar.
Turning back toward the fateful gate, I ran rapidly along the edge of the clearing, taking the ground in the mighty leaps that had first made me famous upon Barsoom.
The gates and shops were all closed, only here and there round the taverns solitary shouts or drunken songs could be heard.
They have returned through another gate, or perchance these be the troops that remained to defend the city?
From the Hump we can see the gate that is called after Miss Mabel Grey, the Fig I promised to tell you about.
They had covered a good portion of the distance to the gate without mishap when there came to their ears from the central portion of the city sounds of a great commotion.
He was aware that the grunting and screaming of Sheeta in the tree above them would set their nerves on edge, and that his pounding upon their gate after dark would still further add to their terror.
He came presently to a small gate beside which was a low building and before the doorway of the building a warrior standing guard.
He saw that when the Lady Maud accompanied him they were wont to repair to the farthermost extremities of the palace grounds where, by a little postern gate, she admitted a certain officer of the Guards to whom the Queen had forbidden the privilege of the court.
The sentry stood at the open gate, looking in the direction of the forest, so that he did not see the agile giant that dropped to the ground at the far end of the village street.
Granet, a few days later, brought his car to a standstill in front of an ordinary five-barred gate upon which was painted in white letters "Market Burnham Hall.