gastric varices


Also found in: Wikipedia.

gastric varices

varices located in the gastric mucosa, most commonly in the cardia and fundus, as a result of portal hypertension, which are prone to ulceration and massive bleeding. Gastric varices are difficult to treat endoscopically and may require TIPS placement.

gas·tric va·ri·ces

(gastrik vari-sēz)
Varices located in gastric mucosa, most commonly in the cardia and fundus, as a result of portal hypertension, which are prone to ulceration and massive bleeding.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of 60 patients with a recent history of bleeding gastric varices enrolled in this prospective, randomized study, 31 were treated with endoscopic obturation using butyl cyanoacrylate injections, and 29 were treated using endoscopic band ligation.
Bleeding gastric varices can be controlled more effectively and safely using endoscopic obturation with cyanoacrylate glue than using band ligation, according to Dr.
We describe two patients similar to those previously reported two who developed bleeding gastric varices from left-sided (sinistral) portal hypertension as a result of advanced pancreatic cancer.
While isolated asymptomatic (nonbleeding) gastric varices do not warrant surgical intervention, symptomatic (bleeding) gastric va rices warrant appropriate diagnostic evaluation to exclude splenic vein occlusion.
Gastric varices can also be seen in cases of isolated splenic vein thrombosis.
Occasionally gastric varices appear as polypoid masses on endoscopy (Figure 12), leading to biopsy.
Sclerotherapy versus variceal band ligation for oesophageal varices: influence on gastropathy, gastric varices and variceal recurrences.
Prophylactic endoscopic sclerotherapy of large osephago- gastric varices in infants with biliary atresia.
Moreover, nearly all (11/12) of the patients who bled "had esophageal or gastric varices at the time of initial screening endoscopy," Dr.
Numerous gastric varices, porta hepatis and splenic hilum collaterals were noted.
This will allow identification of non-variceal causes of haemorrhage, which occur in 10% of cases, and those who may be bleeding from gastric varices or portal hypertensive gastropathy.
Causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding-related degree of bleeding severity Site Degree of Oesophageal Gastric Duodenal bleeding Major common Oesophageal Gastric varices Benign ulcer varices Portal hypertensive Mallory-Weiss gastropathy tear Benign ulcer Major uncommon Dieulafoy's lesion Haemobilia Haemosuccus pancreas Aorto-enteric fistula Gastric cancer Usually minor Oesophagitis Gastritis Oesophageal Gastric antral cancer vascular ectasia Table 2.