gastric ulcer

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Related to gastric ulcer: gastritis, duodenal ulcer, Gastric cancer


a local defect, or excavation of the surface of an organ or tissue, produced by sloughing of necrotic inflammatory tissue.
aphthous ulcer a small painful ulcer in the mouth, approximately 2 to 5 mm in diameter. It usually remains for five to seven days and heals within two weeks with no scarring.
chronic leg ulcer ulceration of the lower leg caused by peripheral vascular disease involving either arteries and arterioles or veins and venules of the affected limb. Arterial and venous ulcers are quite different and require different modes of treatment. Venous stasis ulcers occur as a result of venous insufficiency in the lower limb. The insufficiency is due to deep vein thrombosis and failure of the one-way valves that act during muscle contraction to prevent the backflow of blood. Chronic varicosities of the veins can also cause venous stasis.

Patient Care. Stasis ulcers are difficult to treat because impaired blood flow interferes with the normal healing process and prolongs repair. Patient care is concerned with preventing a superimposed infection in the ulcer, increasing blood flow in the deeper veins, and decreasing pressure within the superficial veins.
decubitus ulcer pressure ulcer.
duodenal ulcer an ulcer of the duodenum, one of the two most common types of peptic ulcer.
gastric ulcer an ulcer of the inner wall of the stomach, one of the two most common kinds of peptic ulcer.
Hunner's ulcer one involving all layers of the bladder wall, seen in interstitial cystitis.
hypertensive ischemic ulcer a manifestation of infarction of the skin due to arteriolar occlusion as part of a longstanding vascular disease, seen especially in women in late middle age, and presenting as a red painful plaque on the lower limb or ankle that later breaks down into a superficial ulcer surrounded by a zone of purpuric erythema.
marginal ulcer a peptic ulcer occurring at the margin of a surgical anastomosis of the stomach and small intestine or duodenum. Marginal ulcers are a frequent complication of surgical treatment for peptic ulcer; they are difficult to control medically and often require further surgery.
peptic ulcer see peptic ulcer.
perforating ulcer one that involves the entire thickness of an organ, creating an opening on both surfaces.
phagedenic ulcer
1. any of a group of conditions due to secondary bacterial invasion of a preexisting cutaneous lesion or the intact skin of an individual with impaired resistance as a result of a systemic disease, which is characterized by necrotic ulceration associated with prominent tissue destruction.
pressure ulcer see pressure ulcer.
rodent ulcer ulcerating basal cell carcinoma of the skin.
stasis ulcer ulceration on the ankle due to venous insufficiency and venous stasis.
stress ulcer a type of peptic ulcer, usually gastric, resulting from stress; possible predisposing factors include changes in the microcirculation of the gastric mucosa, increased permeability of the gastric mucosa barrier to H+, and impaired cell proliferation.
trophic ulcer one due to imperfect nutrition of the part.
tropical ulcer
1. a lesion of cutaneous leishmaniasis.
tropical phagedenic ulcer a chronic, painful phagedenic ulcer usually seen on the lower limbs of malnourished children in the tropics; the etiology is unknown, but spirochetes, fusiform bacilli, and other bacteria are often present in the developing lesion, and protein and vitamin deficiency with lowered resistance to infection may play a role in the etiology.
varicose ulcer an ulcer due to varicose veins.
venereal ulcer a nonspecific term referring to the formation of ulcers resembling chancre or chancroid about the external genitalia; there are both sexually transmitted and other types.

gas·tric ul·cer

an ulcer of the stomach.

gastric ulcer

An ulcer occurring in the mucous membrane of the stomach.

gastric ulcer

gastric ulcer

A hole in gastric mucosa due to gastric secretions, related to H pylori in the mucosa, NSAIDs, cigarette smoking etc; the pain of a GU may not correlate with the severity of ulceration Diagnosis Barium x-ray, endoscopy Complications Bleeding, perforation, gastric obstruction

gas·tric ul·cer

(gas'trik ŭl'sĕr)
An ulcer of the stomach.
Synonym(s): Cruveilhier ulcer.

gastric ulcer

A local defect in the mucous membrane lining of the stomach as a result of the loss of mucus and other protection against the action of acid and digestive enzymes. Stomach ulcers are treated with ANTACIDS and H2 receptor antagonist drugs such CIMETIDINE.

Gastric (or peptic) ulcer

An ulcer (sore) of the stomach, duodenum or other part of the gastrointestinal system. Though the causes are not fully understood, they include excessive secretion of gastric acid, stress, heredity, and the use of certain drugs, especially acetylsalicylic acid and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs.
Mentioned in: Pyloroplasty


pertaining to, affecting, or originating in the stomach.

gastric acid
see gastric juice (below).
gastric atony
a large distended stomach lacking in tone as seen in a horse that is a windsucker and continuously swallows air. Predisposes to chronic indigestion.
gastric cicatricial contraction
in horses causes constriction of the stomach and subsequent dilatation of the dorsal sac.
gastric dilatation
see gastric dilatation colic.
gastric dilatation-displacement
see gastric dilatation-volvulus (below).
gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV)
a syndrome of gastric dilatation leading to volvulus, seen most often in deep-chested, large breed dogs. The etiology is unclear, but aerophagia or overeating are important factors. Gastric hemorrhage and ulceration, hypotensive, hypovolemic shock, and severe electrolyte disturbances contribute to the high mortality. Surgical intervention is often required, cardiac dysrhythmias complicate recovery, and recurrences are common. Called also gastric dilatation-displacement, bloat.
gastric distention
in pigs commonly results in vomiting.
gastric edema
an accompaniment of edema in most organs in cases where edema is widespread; as a sole lesion is significant in the abomasum in cases of arsenic poisoning, ostertagiasis and in edema disease in pigs.
gastric emptying time
the time taken for the stomach to begin to empty of contents; demonstrated in contrast radiography. Delayed in gastric retention due to dysfunction of the pylorus, abnormalities of gastric motility, foreign bodies and systemic diseases.
gastric fluid
see gastric juice (below).
gastric folds
folds in the gastric mucosa and part of the submucosa oriented in the direction of the long axis of the stomach, as they are in the abomasum; they may be few and simple or numerous and tortuous, as in the dog.
gastric foreign body
occurs most commonly in dogs, causing vomiting. Occasionally it may pass into the small intestine, causing partial or complete obstruction with more severe signs of dehydration, shock, and sometimes perforation with peritonitis. A variety of objects may be swallowed, e.g. needles, balls, children's toys, bones, fish hooks and socks, to name a few.
gastric habronemiasis
gastric hemorrhage
caused by gastric ulcer or foreign body. May cause sudden death due to exsanguination, as in pigs with esophagogastric ulcer, or anemia with melena.
gastric hormones
see gastrointestinal hormones.
gastric impaction
in horses fed a diet of coarse indigestible roughage; a cause of subacute colic.
gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP)
a tentative gut hormone secreted by the mucosa of the small intestine and playing a part in controlling gastric (inhibition) and intestinal (stimulation) secretion and insulin release (stimulation).
gastric intubation
gastric invagination
a technique for gastric resection in which areas of nonviable gastric wall are folded inward and the remainder sutured together so the necrotic tissue sloughs into the gastric lumen.
gastric juice
the secretion of glands in the walls of the stomach for use in digestion. Its essential ingredients are pepsin, an enzyme that breaks down proteins in food, and hydrochloric acid, which destroys bacteria and is of assistance in the digestive process.
gastric motility
varies between the three regions of the stomach, being most active in the antrum, has a basic slow wave motility and a capacity to increase in response to the fullness of the stomach and to decrease with a rise in acidity of the duodenal contents.
gastric mucosa
secretes pepsin (as pepsinogen), hydrochloric acid.
gastric neoplasia
includes adenocarcinoma, carcinoma, benign adenomatous polyps, leiomyomas, plasmacytoma, squamous cell carcinoma.
gastric outlet obstruction
see pyloric obstruction, pyloric outflow failure.
gastric peptidases
includes pepsin A, trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, carboxypeptidase A, carboxypeptidase B.
gastric perforation
in horses occurs secondarily to lesions of the stomach wall, especially squamous cell carcinoma; causes a local peritonitis, often with extension to the spleen.
gastric pits
multiple small depressions in the gastric area of the stomach; a gastric gland opens into the bottom of each pit.
gastric rotation
rotations of the stomach in the embryonic abdomen between its first appearance and its final disposition. In simple-stomached animals such as dogs two rotations are recognized, from the axial tube ventrally and to the left.
gastric rupture
causes sudden cessation of abdominal pain caused by distention; acute endotoxic shock and peracute, diffuse peritonitis kill the animal within a few hours.
gastric squamous-cell carcinoma
the commonest gastric neoplasm in horses. Seen usually in the advanced stages of anorexia and weight loss. Characterized by a fungating mass in the pars esophagea often with secondary implants locally, sometimes widespread in other organs.
gastric torsion
in sows, predisposed by large, sloppy meal and great excitement at feeding time leading to very fast eating. There is a short course with death due to shock and infarction of the stomach wall. See also gastric dilatation-volvulus (above).
gastric ulcer
an ulcer of the inner wall of the stomach. It occurs in all species at a low level but causes little disease. There is a high prevalence in horses racing and in training and is thought to result in impaired appetite. In horses, also caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Esophagogastric ulcer in pigs may reach epidemic proportions in some piggeries and cause serious mortalities due to blood loss. Called also gastric mucosal ulceration.
gastric venous infarction
gross lesions of bright red to dark red mucosa; occur in many septicemias, viremias and toxemias in horses and pigs.
gastric waves
peristaltic waves, the pacemakers for antral peristalsis.

Patient discussion about gastric ulcer

Q. Stomach ulcer or bad heartburn? hi. i am not sure if this is just heartburn or maybe i have an ulcer. for the last 7 months i have been getting really severe pains in my stomach (between my chest and my belly button). my upper back gets sharp pains and my stomach bloats out like I’m 8 months pregnant!!!. i have tried to take antacids for this but nothing works. i don’t know what else to do. it scares me sometimes because i have no idea what it is. My mom thinks it could be an ulcer. the pain lasts for a good 4 to 5 hours and i cant even sit down because the pain hurts so bad. can anyone tell me what this might be?????

A. After 7 months with an ulcer you’d be vomiting blood and may have blood in your feces. Anti acid would have helped. So what you say doesn’t sound anything like it. I think a good idea will be going the next morning to see a Dr. – looking for a diagnosis on the web is not a very good idea. And even if you know for certain that you have an ulcer- it is curable. Why wait 7 months?

Q. What is the difference between duodenal ulcer and stomach ulcer? I was diagnosed recently with duodenal ulcer. I heard the term stomach ulcer but not duodenal. What causes duodenal and what cause stomach ulcer? And how do they treat duodenal ulcer?

A. The duodenum is right after the stomach. They are both (as published a few years back) caused 90% of the time from a bacteria named helicobacter pylori. Hence the treatment for it is probably antibiotics. But I guess that should be your doctor’s call. Good luck!

More discussions about gastric ulcer
References in periodicals archive ?
The lesions of a gastric ulcer usually were received as Ulcer Index, which was converted from ulcer areas, and gastric ulcer area ([mm.
suffruticosa can ameliorate gastric ulcers in vivo, probably due to the anti-oxidative potential of this herb.
Shaik AS, Singh B, Haffejee AA: Gastrocolic fistula as a complication of benign gastric ulcer.
Anti-ulcer effects of DMHBR against acute gastric ulcer models: The DMHBR exhibited significant anti-ulcer effects against induced gastric and duodenal ulcers.
Drugs Profiles discussed in this report includes 300-PXN-0040, anaprazole sodium, ASP-6537, DWJ-206, PMKS-005, PRD-007 and Small Molecules for Gastric Ulcers.
Sub-group A for CRU model: Rats were administered with reference drug omeprazole (10 mg/kg), 45 min prior to the induction of gastric ulcer.
The test drug NR-ANX-C reduced the gastric juice volume and acid content, and increased the adherent gastric mucus content in both models of gastric ulcer, suggesting a possible cytoprotective action and inhibition of gastric acid secretion.
Marshall, gastric ulcers occurred in 69 percent fewer study participants treated with risedronate compared to those treated with alendronate (4.
AT and 6-HL exhibited anti ulcer activity in experimentally induced ulcer models including cold restraint stress (CRU), alcohol (AL), pylorus ligation-induced gastric ulcer (PL) models and they also showed ulcer healing effect in chronic acetic acid-induced ulcer model (AC).