gastric analysis


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analysis

 [ah-nal´ĭ-sis] (pl. anal´yses)
separation into component parts.
psychoanalysis. adj., adj analyt´ic.
activity analysis the breaking down of an activity into its smallest components for the purpose of assessment.
bivariate analysis statistical procedures that involve the comparison of summary values from two groups on the same variable or of two variables within a group.
blood gas analysis see blood gas analysis.
chromosome analysis see chromosome.
concept analysis examination of the attributes of a concept as it occurs in ordinary usage in order to identify the meanings attached to the concept.
content analysis a systematic procedure for the quantification and objective examination of qualitative data, such as written or oral messages, by the classification and evaluation of terms, themes, or ideas; for example, the measurement of frequency, order, or intensity of occurrence of the words, phrases, or sentences in a communication in order to determine their meaning or effect.
correlational analysis a statistical procedure to determine the direction of a relationship (positive or negative correlation) between two variables and the strength of the relationship (ranging from perfect correlation through no correlation to perfect inverse correlation and expressed by the absolute value of the correlation coefficient).
analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) a variation of analysis of variance that adjusts for confounding by continuous variables.
data analysis the reduction and organization of a body of data to produce results that can be interpreted by the researcher; a variety of quantitative and qualitative methods may be used, depending upon the nature of the data to be analyzed and the design of the study.
ego analysis in psychoanalytic treatment, the analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the ego, especially its defense mechanisms against unacceptable unconscious impulses.
gait analysis see gait analysis.
gastric analysis see gastric analysis.
multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) a laboratory tool designed to recognize tandem repeats and other qualities in the genome of an individual to provide a high resolution DNA fingerprint for the purpose of identification.
multivariate analysis statistical techniques used to examine more than two variables at the same time.
power analysis a statistical procedure that is used to determine the number of required subjects in a study in order to show a significant difference at a predetermined level of significance and size of effect; it is also used to determine the power of a test from the sample size, size of effect, and level of significance in order to determine the risk of Type II error when the null hypothesis is accepted.
qualitative analysis the determination of the nature of the constituents of a compound or a mixture of compounds.
quantitative analysis determination of the proportionate quantities of the constituents of a compound or mixture.
SNP analysis analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms to assess artificially produced genetic modifications or identify different strains of an organism.
transactional analysis a type of psychotherapy based on an understanding of the interactions (transactions) between patient and therapist and between patient and others in the environment; see also transactional analysis.
analysis of variance ANOVA; a statistical test used to examine differences among two or more groups by comparing the variability between the groups with the variability within the groups.
variance analysis the identification of patient or family needs that are not anticipated and the actions related to these needs in a system of managed care. There are four kinds of origin for the variance: patient-family origin, system-institutional origin, community origin, and clinician origin.
vector analysis analysis of a moving force to determine both its magnitude and its direction, e.g., analysis of the scalar electrocardiogram to determine the magnitude and direction of the electromotive force for one complete cycle of the heart.

gastric

 [gas´trik]
pertaining to, affecting, or originating in the stomach.
gastric analysis analysis of the stomach contents by microscopy and tests to determine the amount of hydrochloric acid present. The tests performed are of value in diagnosing peptic ulcer, cancer of the stomach, and pernicious anemia. Gastric secretions are collected by continuous or intermittent aspiration via nasogastric tube. There is a wide overlap of the ranges of normal and abnormal values; hence intermediate values are not indicative of pathology. A total absence of acid (pH above 6.0) occurs in almost all cases of pernicious anemia and in some patients with advanced gastric carcinoma. Hypersecretion of hydrochloric acid is characteristic of zollinger-ellison syndrome, which is marked by intractable, sometimes fulminating peptic ulcer, gastric hyperacidity, and gastrin-secreting pancreatic tumors.
gastric bypass surgical creation of a small gastric pouch that empties directly into the jejunum through a gastrojejunostomy, thereby causing food to bypass the duodenum; done for the treatment of gross obesity.
gastric juice the secretion of glands in the walls of the stomach for use in digestion. Its essential ingredients are pepsin, an enzyme that breaks down proteins in food, and hydrochloric acid, which destroys bacteria and helps in the digestive process.

At the sight and smell of food, the stomach increases its output of gastric juice. When the food reaches the stomach, it is thoroughly mixed with the juice, the breakdown of the proteins is begun and the food then passes on to the duodenum for the next stage of digestion.

Normally the hydrochloric acid in gastric juice does not irritate or injure the delicate stomach tissues. However, in certain persons the stomach produces too much gastric juice, especially between meals when it is not needed, and the gastric secretions presumably erode the stomach lining, producing a peptic ulcer, and also hinder its healing once an ulcer has formed.
gastric partitioning a procedure of the treatment of morbid obesity consisting of the creation of a small pouch in the proximal stomach by two rows of staples, which are deliberately interrupted at one point to allow passage of food from the pouch to the rest of the stomach. This procedure is rarely done today because of its high failure rate. The two favored operations are the gastric bypass and the vertical banded gastroplasty.

gas·tric a·nal·y·sis

measurement of pH and acid output of stomach contents; basal acid output can be determined by collecting the overnight gastric secretion or by a 1-hour collection; maximal acid output is determined following injection of histamine; output is measured by titration with a strong base.

gastric analysis

examination of the contents of the stomach, primarily to determine the quantity of acid present and incidentally to ascertain the presence of blood, bile, bacteria, and abnormal cells. It may also be done to detect acid-fast bacillus in a client with undiagnosed tuberculosis. A sample of gastric secretion is obtained via a nasogastric tube. The technique used varies according to the information desired. The total absence of hydrochloric acid is diagnostic of pernicious anemia. Patients with gastric ulcer and gastric cancer may secrete less acid than normal whereas patients with duodenal ulcers secrete more. The composition and volume of the secretions may also provide diagnostic information. This procedure is rarely performed.

gastric analysis

A procedure in which a tube is inserted in the stomach to obtain gastric fluid, which is then analyzed for pH, volume, electrolytes, mucin, pepsin, gastrin, intrinsic factor. See BAO, MAO.

gas·tric a·nal·y·sis

(gas'trik ă-nal'i-sis)
Measurement of pH and acid output of stomach contents; basal acid output can be determined by collecting the overnight gastric secretion or by a 1-hour collection; maximal acid output is determined following injection of histamine; output is measured by titration with a strong base.