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gas

 [gas]
any elastic aeriform fluid in which the molecules are widely separated from each other and so have free paths.
alveolar gas the gas in the alveoli of the lungs, where gas exchange with the capillary blood takes place.
blood g's the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in blood; see blood gas analysis.
laughing gas nitrous oxide.
gas pains pains caused by distention of the stomach or intestines by accumulation of air or other gases. The presence of gas is indicated by distention of the abdomen, belching, or discharge of gas through the rectum. Gas-forming foods include highly flavored vegetables such as onions, cabbage, and turnips; members of the bean family; and fruits such as melons and raw apples. Some seasonings and other chemical irritants also produce gas.
tear gas any of various irritant vapors dispensed by aerosol and causing pain and severe lacrimation in humans; some also cause irritation of exposed mucous membranes as well as vomiting. Common ones include chloroacetophenone (CN), o-chlorobenzylidenemalononitrile (see CS), and dibenz(b,f)-1,4-oxazepine (see cr); the most common of the three is CS (also known as mace).

GAS

Abbreviation for group A streptococci , under streptococcus.

gas

(gas),
1. A thin fluid, such as air, capable of indefinite expansion but convertible by compression and cold into a liquid and, eventually, a solid.
2. In clinical practice, a liquid entirely in its vapor phase at one atmosphere of pressure because ambient temperature is above its boiling point.
[coined by J.B. van Helmont, Flemish chemist and physician, 1579-1644]

gas

(gas) any elastic aeriform fluid in which the molecules are separated from one another and so have free paths.gas´eous
alveolar gas  the gas in the alveoli of the lungs, where gaseous exchange with the capillary blood takes place.
blood gases  the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in blood; see under analysis.
coal gas  a gas, poisonous because it contains carbon monoxide, produced by destructive distillation of coal; much used for domestic cooking.
laughing gas  nitrous oxide.
tear gas  one which produces severe lacrimation by irritating the conjunctivae.

gas

(găs)
n. pl. gases or gasses
1.
a. The state of matter distinguished from the solid and liquid states by relatively low density and viscosity, relatively great expansion and contraction with changes in pressure and temperature, the ability to diffuse readily, and the spontaneous tendency to become distributed uniformly throughout any container.
b. A substance in the gaseous state.
2. A gaseous asphyxiant, irritant, or poison.
3. A gaseous anesthetic, such as nitrous oxide.
4.
a. Flatulence.
b. Flatus.
v. gassed, gassing, gases or gasses
v.tr.
1. To treat chemically with gas.
2. To overcome, disable, or kill with poisonous fumes.

gas

Etymology: Gk, chaos
an aeriform fluid that possesses complete molecular mobility and the property of indefinite expansion. A gas has no definite shape, and its volume is determined by its container and by temperature and pressure. Compare liquid, solid. gaseous, adj.

GAS

abbreviation for general adaptation syndrome.

GALNS

A gene on chromosome 16q24.3 that encodes N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase, a lysosomal exohydrolase required for the degradation of glycosaminoglycans, keratan sulfate and chondroitin 6-sulfate.

Molecular pathology
Defects of GALNS cause Morquio A syndrome, a lysosomal storage disease.

gas

A volatilized liquid. See Biogas, Compressed gas, Flammable gas, Greenhouse gas, Mustard, Natural gas, Oxidant gas, Phosgene gas Occupational medicine A gas phase contaminant. See Inhalant.

gas

(gas)
1. Fluid, like air, capable of indefinite expansion but convertible by compression and cold into a liquid and, eventually, a solid.
2. In clinical practice, a substance entirely in its vapor phase at 1 atmosphere of pressure because ambient temperature is above its boiling point.
[coined by J.B. van Helmont, Flemish chemist and physician, 1579-1644]

GAS

general adaptation syndrome

GAS,

n.pr See syndrome, general adaptation.

gas

(gas)
1. A thin fluid, such as air, capable of indefinite expansion but convertible by compression and cold into a liquid and, eventually, a solid.
2. In clinical practice, a liquid entirely in its vapor phase at one atmosphere of pressure because ambient temperature is above its boiling point.
[coined by J.B. van Helmont, Flemish chemist and physician, 1579-1644]

GAS,


gas,

n a fluid with no definite volume or shape whose molecules are practically unrestricted by cohesive forces.
gas, laughing,
gas, noble,
n a gas that will not oxidize; the inert gases (e.g., helium and neon).
gas, olefiant,
n a machine that uses ethylene oxide gas to sterilize objects that cannot withstand high temperatures, such as soft plastic and cloth.

gas

any elastic aeriform fluid in which the molecules are widely separated from each other and so have free paths.

alveolar gas
the gas in the alveoli of the lungs, where gaseous exchange with the capillary blood takes place. See also oxygen, carbon dioxide.
blood gas
gas bubble disease
a disease of fish in tanks in which the water is supersaturated with oxygen or nitrogen. Gas embolism develops in the gills. Air bubbles can be seen in the gills, eyes and under the skin and the fish show bizarre nervous behavior.
gas cap
a cap of gas above fluid or solid contents in a hollow viscus, e.g. in a static rumen. Seen radiologically in distended intestinal loops in paralytical ileus.
gas edema disease
gas exchange
gases move by simple diffusion in response to pressure differences; net diffusion occurs from areas of high pressure to areas of lower pressure irrespective of whether the gas is present as a gas or in solution or gases moving from gas to solution or vice versa. The rate of exchange of gases in body tissues, e.g. between alveolar space and erythrocyte, is influenced by many other factors, especially the diffusion distance and the solubility of the gas.
gas inhalation
irritant gases, e.g. manure gas, cause pulmonary edema.
laughing gas
nitrous oxide.
manure gas poisoning
see manure pit gas poisoning.
tear gas
a gas that produces severe lacrimation by irritating the conjunctivae. See lacrimator.
gas transport
relates to the efficiency of transport of gas, e.g. oxygen, by the patient as a whole. The efficiency of gas transport varies widely between normal individuals and between species, e.g. athletic breeds of horses and dogs have much faster gas transport systems than human athletes; the efficiency of gas transport in the individual depends largely on the rapidity of increase in minute ventilation, plus a similar rate of increase in cardiac output.
gas tube

Patient discussion about gas

Q. why do i have gas and bloating my bowels are weird and my stomach is sour also. i have pain in the top of my stomach

A. There are many different things that can cause them. Do you also suffer from diarrhea? Do you have diabetes? Do you have pain that is relieved by eating or after going to the bathroom?

Among the more common causes there are IBS (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irritable_bowel_syndrome), diabetes, malabsorption (e.g. lactose intolerance http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactose_intolerance or celiac http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coeliac_disease), all of these, unfortunately, can't be diagnosed over the net, so if it keeps bothering you or if you have warning sign (such as Nocturnal abdominal pain (sleep awakening), Weight loss, Blood in the stool , Severely tender abdomen , Succussion splash , Fever , Vomiting , fatty diarrhea , New onset diarrhea) you should see a doctor.

Q. I often have gases in my stomach. And it hurts. Is there specific food I should avoid? thanks

A. Why don't you try to run a log of what you eat and how did you feel after that? The digestive system of each of us is different, so it may not be possible to give you advice that would be good for you specifically. If these complaints bothers you, you may also want to consult a docotr.

www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003124.htm

More discussions about gas
References in periodicals archive ?
The total volume of evolved gases decreases in the following order: silicate esters |is greater than~ shell furan/hotbox and furan/acid |is greater than~ phenolic isocyanate.
Scott, "Decomposition of Resin Binders and the Relationship Between the Gases Formed and the Casting Surface Quality--Part 3," AFS Transactions, p 209-226 (1977).
Bates, "Decomposition of Resin Binders and the Relationship Between Gases Formed and the Casting Surface Quality," AFS Transactions, p 519-524 (1975).
Therefore, one important goal in arriving at the genesis and the certain identification of the gases inside defects remains a prime goal of metallurgical study and research.
They may not even contain the same gases, but to date, the ability to analyze the gases trapped within defects is unknown.
It prevents most carrier gases from crossing over into the source.
With the RainMaker, controlled and purified vapor can be delivered into most carrier gases including hydrogen at flow rates as low as 18 micrograms per minute or as high as 1 kilogram per minute depending on the model, carrier gas, and delivery pressure.
with entrapped gases, increase the metal pouring temperature to increase metal fluid life, which provides entrapped gases more time to escape the mold and/or metal;
with soluble gases, reduce the pouring temperature to reduce the chance for gases to be dissolved in the metal;
Vents on top of the casting cavity will allow gases to escape prior to the complete filling of the cavity or possibly while the metal is in the molten state.
Soluble Gas--This refers to gases that dissolve in molten metal.
During solidification, the dissolved gases will precipitate into tiny bubbles of gas, forming pinholes in the casting.