garlic


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Related to garlic: ginger

al·li·um

(al'ē-ŭm),
Allium sativum (family Liliaceae), its bulb contains up to 0.9% of volatile irritating oil with antiseptic action; has been used as a diaphoretic, diuretic, and expectorant.
Synonym(s): garlic
[L.]

garlic

/gar·lic/ (gahr´lik) the flowering plant Allium sativum, or its bulbous stem base, which contains the antibacterial allicin; preparations of the bulbs are used for hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and arteriosclerosis; also used in folk medicine.

garlic

an herbal product taken from a perennial bulb grown throughout the world.
uses It is used for vascular disease, elevated LDL, elevated triglycerides, low HDL, high blood pressure, poor circulation, risk of cancer, inflammatory disorders, childhood ear infection, and yeast infection. The allicin of fresh garlic may cause a small decrease in LDL cholesterol and slight decrease in blood pressure and may have some antibacterial properties, but garlic is not nearly as effective as prescribed drugs for these purposes. Its influence on cancer risk and efficacy for other uses has not been adequately documented. Allicin is very labile, and there is concern that many commercial products contain less than the advertised amount of allicin.
contraindications In normal amounts, garlic is likely safe during pregnancy and for children. Garlic should not be used in large amounts during pregnancy, because it may be fatal to the fetus or stimulate labor. Large amounts also should not be given to children directly or via breast milk because it may cause colic in infants or be fatal to children through uncharacterized mechanisms. It is contraindicated in those with known hypersensitivity, stomach inflammation, or gastritis. People who have had or are about to have surgery should also avoid it, since clotting time may be increased.
A culinary and medicinal perennial plant that contains amino acids and volatile oils (e.g., allicin and vitamins A, B and C) and owes its aroma to the high content of selenium, which is eliminated through the lungs and skin as dimethyl selenide
Chinese medicine Chinese chive, da suan Garlic is used in traditional Chinese medicine as an antimicrobial and general tonic, and for colds, cough, diarrhoea, gastrontestinal complaints, parasites, rheumatic disease, shellfish poisoning, tuberculosis, tumours and vaginitis, as well as to increase internal secretions, and topically for athlete’s foot, fungal and parasitic infections. See Chinese herbal medicine
Herbal medicine In Western herbal medicine, garlic is used internally for atherosclerosis, colds, coughs, flu, gastrointestinal complaints, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, liver and gallbladder disease and as an anthelmintic; as with Chinese herbal medicine, it is used topically for athlete’s foot, fungal and parasitic infections and as a rubefacient. See Herbal medicine

gar·lic

(gahr'lik)
A herbal product promoted for treatment of vascular disease, dyslipidemias, and hypertension.

garlic,

n Latin name:
Allium sativum; part used: roots (bulbs); uses: anti-lipidemic, antimicrobial, antiasthmatic, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, antiplatelet, antidiabetic, and potential anticancer; precautions: patients with hyperthyroidism, gastritis; those taking anticoagulants, insulin, antidiabetics, or acidophilus. Also called
ail, allium, camphor of the poor, da-suan, knoblaunch, la-suan, nectar of the gods, poor-man's treacle, rustic treacle, or
stinking rose.
Enlarge picture
Garlic.

garlic

alliumsativum.

Patient discussion about garlic

Q. Is garlic helpful in heart ailments? I have heard that garlic is very good for cardiac health and using in curries or cooked with foods will be helpful. I have also heard that it has anti-inflammatory substances and also helps in weight loss. Is garlic helpful in heart ailments?

A. It acts as antioxidant and reduces the amount of free radicals in your body. It’s helpful once taken raw. But the raw garlic can cause bad breadth and blistering of skin and diarrhea. So, there should be a reduced intake of raw garlic. It’s better to have garlic in a cooked up form like in curries or with vegetables. This will also give the desired benefits of garlic and the side effect of over consumption of garlic will also be reduced.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jOrw1eB-uc&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/vng-A24JmWJY_iceland_heart_protection_formula?q=heart&feature=player_embedded

More discussions about garlic
References in classic literature ?
When he came to the last tree he took the garlic and rubbed himself all over carefully, and the dholes yelled with scorn.
There was not a sting upon him, for the smell of the garlic had checked the Little People for just the few seconds that he was among them.
Plenty of onions and garlic and a dash of red pepper.
salt and garlic, and with a rascal bath of vinegar polluted with
Nought, my sire, save that I have heard men say that there is a dish named an olla which is prepared there, though I have never been clear in my mind as to whether it was but a ragout such as is to be found in the south, or whether there is some seasoning such as fennel or garlic which is peculiar to Spain.
Then, too, there was a meaty fisherman's stew, delicious with garlic, and crusty Italian bread without butter, and all washed down with pint mugs of thick and heady claret.
They saw a man about forty years of age, standing under a willow tree, eating bread that had been rubbed with a clove of garlic.
The myriads who built the pyramids to be the tombs of the Pharaohs were fed on garlic, and it may be were not decently buried themselves.
Father Simon had the curiosity to stay to inform himself what dainties the country justice had to feed on in all his state, which he had the honour to taste of, and which was, I think, a mess of boiled rice, with a great piece of garlic in it, and a little bag filled with green pepper, and another plant which they have there, something like our ginger, but smelling like musk, and tasting like mustard; all this was put together, and a small piece of lean mutton boiled in it, and this was his worship's repast.
The group Chair So added, With less than 15 percent of the country s garlic requirements produced locally, importers and traders that form the garlic cartel continue to dictate prices since there s no local production to counter the steep price of imported and/or smuggled garlic.
So his team randomly assigned roughly a quarter of the participants to eat four grams (around 1 1/2 teaspoons) a day of raw garlic.
6 THE smell of garlic can sometimes be overpowering.