gargle


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gargle

 [gahr´g'l]
1. a solution for rinsing the mouth and throat.
2. to rinse the mouth and throat by holding a solution in the open mouth and agitating it by expulsion of air from the lungs.

gar·gle

(gar'gĕl),
1. To rinse the fauces with fluid in the mouth through which expired breath is forced to produce a bubbling effect while the head is held far back. It is therapeutically ineffective.
2. A medicated fluid used for gargling; a throat wash.
[O. Fr. fr. L. gurgulio, gullet, windpipe]

gargle

/gar·gle/ (gahr´g'l)
1. a solution for rinsing mouth and throat.
2. to rinse the mouth and throat by holding a solution in the open mouth and agitating it by expulsion of air from the lungs.

gargle

(gär′gəl)
v. gar·gled, gar·gling, gar·gles
v.intr.
1. To force exhaled air through a liquid held in the back of the mouth, with the head tilted back, in order to cleanse or medicate the mouth or throat.
2. To produce the sound of gargling when speaking or singing.
v.tr.
1. To rinse or medicate (the mouth or throat) by gargling.
2. To circulate or apply (a medicine or solution) by gargling.
3. To utter with a gargling sound.
n.
1. A medicated solution for gargling.
2. A gargling sound.

gargle

[gär′gəl]
Etymology: Fr, gargouille, drainpipe
1 v, to hold and agitate a liquid at the back of the throat by tilting the head backward and forcing air through the solution. The procedure is used for cleansing or medicating the mouth and oropharynx.
2 n, a solution used to rinse the mouth and oropharynx.

gargle

noun A liquid preparation of H2O or other substance used as an intraoral wash (e.g., for sore throat), which is not intended to be ingested.
 
verb To tilt an opened and fluid-filled mouth upwards, allowing air to emanate from the trachea, resulting in a gurgling sound.

gargle

noun A liquid preparation of H2O2 or other substance used as an intraoral wash–eg, for sore throat, which is not intended to be ingested verbTo tilt an opened and fluid, often mouthwash-filled mouth heavenwards, allowing air to emanate from the trachea, resulting in a gurgling sound

gar·gle

(gahr'gĕl)
1. To rinse the fauces with fluid through which expired breath is forced to produce a bubbling effect while the head is held far back.
2. A medicated fluid used for gargling; a throat wash.
[O. Fr. fr. L. gurgulio, gullet, windpipe]

gar·gle

(gahr'gĕl)
1. To rinse the fauces with fluid in the mouth through which expired breath is forced to produce a bubbling effect while the head is held far back. It is therapeutically ineffective.
2. A medicated fluid used for gargling.
[O. Fr. fr. L. gurgulio, gullet, windpipe]
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on the age-old home remedy of gargling with warm salt water to heal sore throats, Gargle Away was invented by President Juliet A.
Perhaps the funniest line came in 1969 when Prince Philip - not usually one to mince his words - asked gravelly-voiced Tom Jones: "What do you gargle with, pebbles?
And at the appropriate time, I tottered off to the toilet for a gargle of the green stuff.
Subjects told to gargle thrice daily for a study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine in 2005 saw the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections drop 40 percent compared with participants who didn't gargle.
Grow Your Own Drugs (8pm) James Wong demonstrates how turmeric can be used to ease muscular aches, and inviting two volunteers to discover how a pungent onion gargle can solve the problem of their recurring sore throats.
Sainsbury's ([red star][red star][red star][block star][block star]) offering was more sweet than minty, but it was smooth and easy to gargle.
VINEGAR: Gargle with a mouthful of warm vinegar with half a tablespoon of salt for about 30 seconds, three times a day.
I guess you'll just have to do a Gargle search for it.
Controls were asked to gargle with normal saline if they could not produce sputum.
Gargle with one tablespoon of cider vinegar and one teaspoon of salt dissolved in a glass of warm water.
This shock-and-awe ride will make you squeal, scream, laugh and gargle," added The Simpsons creator Matt Groening as a human cannonball, fireworks, a jazz band and confetti combined to launch the maniacal 4-D journey.
Soluble aspirin can be used to gargle with if you have a sore throat.