garden

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garden

grown in gardens; cultivated.

garden bean
garden lupin
lupinuspolyphyllus.
garden nightshade
solanumnigrum.
garden pea
pisumsativum.

Patient discussion about garden

Q. I got runny nose every morning and in the evening. Never had this problem before. Worst still is gardening. Why why why?

A. I have Janet Craig, and Corn plan Draceanas, Spider Plants, Chinese Evergreen, Weeping Fig, Pothos,and Peace Lilly; plus others. The largest are the Draceanas and those named are supposed to be among the best at cleaning toxins from the air. They Rubber Plants are a good choice but I'm running out of room! Jade may want some company!

More discussions about garden
References in classic literature ?
The gardener told him to cut down an old fruit tree which had quite died away, and Camaralzaman took an axe and fell to vigorously.
The King was beside himself for joy, and hurried at once to the garden and made the gardener pick him some of the fruit.
At the same instant the monstrous figure of the gardener with the streaming beard stood again on the green ridge against the sky, waving others to come on; but now waving not a rake but a cutlass.
It had revolutionized his standards of value--forced him to consider himself as a man, entirely apart from his skill as a gardener.
But he still remains so absorbed by the portrait that he stands immovable before it until the young gardener has closed the shutters, when he comes out of the room in a dazed state that is an odd though a sufficient substitute for interest and follows into the succeeding rooms with a confused stare, as if he were looking everywhere for Lady Dedlock again.
muttered Cornelius casting on her a glance in which there was much more of the lover than of the gardener, and which afforded Rosa some consolation.
On the first occasion she told me the poison was wanted by the gardener for use in the conservatories.
In the first ecstasy of having a garden all my own, and in my burning impatience to make the waste places blossom like a rose, I did one warm Sunday in last year's April during the servants' dinner hour, doubly secure from the gardener by the day and the dinner, slink out with a spade and a rake and feverishly dig a little piece of ground and break it up and sow surreptitious ipomaea, and run back very hot and guilty into the house, and get into a chair and behind a book and look languid just in time to save my reputation.
The gardener seemed even to have been conversing, but at sight of the detectives he planted his spade sullenly in a bed and, saying something about his breakfast, shifted along the lines of cabbages and shut himself in the kitchen.
He had seen her before either I or the gardener had seen her, though we knew which way to look, and he didn't.
left this place when his lady died, feeling it lonely like, and went up to London, where he stopped some months; but finding that place as lonely as this--as I suppose and have always heard say--he suddenly came back again with his little girl to the Warren, bringing with him besides, that day, only two women servants, and his steward, and a gardener.
Captain Boldwig was a little fierce man in a stiff black neckerchief and blue surtout, who, when he did condescend to walk about his property, did it in company with a thick rattan stick with a brass ferrule, and a gardener and sub-gardener with meek faces, to whom (the gardeners, not the stick) Captain Boldwig gave his orders with all due grandeur and ferocity; for Captain Boldwig's wife's sister had married a marquis, and the captain's house was a villa, and his land 'grounds,' and it was all very high, and mighty, and great.