gap


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gap

 [gap]
an opening or hiatus.
anion gap the concentration of plasma anions not routinely measured by laboratory screening, accounting for the difference between the routinely measured anions and cations and equal to the plasma sodium − (chloride + bicarbonate); used in the evaluation of acid-base disorders.
auscultatory gap a period in which Korotkoff sounds disappear during auscultation of a patient' s blood pressure.

gap

(gap),
1. A hiatus or opening in a structure.
2. An interval or discontinuity in any series or sequence.
3. A period in the cell cycle.
4. A communicating junction.

gap

(gap) an unoccupied interval in time; an opening or hiatus.
air-bone gap  the lag between the audiographic curves for air- and bone-conducted stimuli, as an indication of loss of bone conduction of the ear.
anion gap  the concentration of plasma anions not routinely measured by laboratory screening, accounting for the difference between the measured anions and cations.
auscultatory gap  a period in which sound is not heard in the auscultatory method of sphygmomanometry.
interocclusal gap  see under distance.

gap

Etymology: OE, gapa, a hole
a short, missing segment in one strand of a DNA molecule.

gap

Vox populi A separation between 2 or more objects or processes. See Anion gap, AC-BC gap, Developmental gap, Gender gap, Osmolar gap, Utilization gap.

gap

(G) (gap)
1. A hiatus or opening in a structure.
2. An interval or discontinuity in any series or sequence.
3. A period in the cell cycle.

gap

(gap)
1. Space created because two adjacent teeth in dental arch do not touch.
2. A hiatus or opening in a structure.
References in classic literature ?
It was a September evening and all the gaps and clearings in the woods were brimmed up with ruby sunset light.
The gap in the wall was instantly observed by both of them.
At the same moment a vague shadowy figure emerged from the gap for which they had been making, and uttered the plaintive signal cry again, on which a second man appeared out of the obscurity.
The instant that their footsteps had died away in the distance, Jefferson Hope sprang to his feet, and helping his companions through the gap, led the way across the fields at the top of his speed, supporting and half-carrying the girl when her strength appeared to fail her.
As on the ruined human wretch vermin parasites appear, so these ruined shelters have bred a crowd of foul existence that crawls in and out of gaps in walls and boards; and coils itself to sleep, in maggot numbers, where the rain drips in; and comes and goes, fetching and carrying fever and sowing more evil in its every footprint than Lord Coodle, and Sir Thomas Doodle, and the Duke of Foodle, and all the fine gentlemen in office, down to Zoodle, shall set right in five hundred years--though born expressly to do it.
The gaps remain, and there are not unpopular lodgings among the rubbish.
The different pieces were thrown out, one after the other, and they disappeared below, making huge gaps in the foliage of the sycamores.
His after history is involved in obscurity and has gaps which conjecture alone can fill.
And through it all moved the Iron Heel, impassive and deliberate, shaking up the whole fabric of the social structure in its search for the comrades, combing out the Mercenaries, the labor castes, and all its secret services, punishing without mercy and without malice, suffering in silence all retaliations that were made upon it, and filling the gaps in its fighting line as fast as they appeared.
There were gaps of silence in the talk, as the dinner got on, that made me feel personally uncomfortable.
In one of the gaps of silence, somebody mentioned the dry and rather nasty subject of human anatomy; whereupon good Mrs.
The night, without, looked black and cold through the dreary gaps in the casement; the precious liquids, now nearly leaked away, dripped with a hollow sound upon the floor; the Maypole peered ruefully in through the broken window, like the bowsprit of a wrecked ship; the ground might have been the bottom of the sea, it was so strewn with precious fragments.