gamma radiation


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gam·ma ra·di·a·tion

ionizing electromagnetic radiation resulting from nuclear processes, such as radioactive decay or fission.

gamma radiation

Etymology: Gk, gamma + L, radiare, to emit rays
a very-high-frequency form of electromagnetic radiation consisting of photons emitted by radioactive elements in the course of nuclear transition. The wavelength of gamma radiation is characteristic of the radioactive elements involved and ranges from about 4 × 10-10 to 5 × 10-13 m. Gamma radiation can penetrate thousands of meters of air and several centimeters of soft tissue and bone. It is more penetrating than alpha radiation and beta radiation but has less ionizing power and is not deflected in electric or magnetic fields. Like x radiation, gamma radiation can injure and destroy body cells and tissue, especially cell nuclei. However, controlled application of gamma radiation is important in the diagnosis and treatment of various conditions, including skin cancer and malignancies deep within the body. Also called gamma rays. See also x-ray.

radiation

The combined processes of emission, transmission and absorption of highly energetic waves and particles on the electromagnetic spectrum treatment to kill cancer cells. See Acute radiation injury, Alpha radiation, Background radiation, Chemoradiation, Coherent radiation, Corpuscular radiation, Definitive radiation, Electromagnetic radiation, External radiation, Gamma radiation, Grenz radiation, Implant radiation, Internal radiation, Ionizing radiation, Non-ionizing radiation, Remnant radiation, Scattered radiation, Synchrotron radiation, Total body irradiation Clinical practice The direct, band-like extension of a sensation, in particular of pain, from a point of origin to another region of the body. Cf Referred pain Oncology The administration of ionizing radiation to kill malignant tumor cells. See Radiation fibrosis, Radiation therapy.
Radiation  
Alpha radiation 2 protons and 2 neutrons, eg plutonium, radon; α radiation travels 15 cm in air and is stopped by a piece of paper; proven role in soft tissue malignancy–see Radium Dial company, relationship with epithelial malignancy is uncertain; it is present in cigarette smoke and may have an additive effect to the known carcinogenic effect of tar; emitted by radium, thorium, uranium.
Beta radiation Electrons, eg strontium-90, tritium–3H; β radiation travels at the speed of light, is stopped by wood and thin metals and is carcinogenic to skin
Gamma radiation Gamma photon A quantum of electromagnetic radiation of ≤ 1 nm, which is generated by unstable nuclei eg 60Co; γ radiation is stopped by several feet of heavy concrete or 10-40 cm of lead and is linked to cancer, inducing mutations at the glycophorin A locus in survivors of atomic blasts; 183/105 excess deaths in survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki blasts, with a 13-fold ↑ in non-lymphocytic leukemia–peaking at 6 yrs post-blast, thyroid nodules and tumors–peaking at 15-20 years post-blast and multiple myeloma 6-fold ↑–peaking 30 yrs post-blast

gam·ma ra·di·a·tion

(gam'ă rā'dē-ā'shŭn)
Ionizing electromagnetic radiation resulting from nuclear processes, such as radioactive decay or fission.

gamma radiation

Electromagnetic radiation of energy greater than several hundred thousand electron volts. With the development of very high voltage X-ray equipment there is now a technological overlap between X-ray and gamma radiation. Formerly, gamma was obtained only from decay of radioactive elements. Gamma radiation is highly penetrative and is valuable in RADIOTHERAPY.

gam·ma ra·di·a·tion

(gam'ă rā'dē-ā'shŭn)
Ionizing electromagnetic radiation resulting from nuclear processes, such as radioactive decay or fission.
References in periodicals archive ?
While X-rays, gamma radiation [though not irradiated food], and even sunlight can cause cancer, microwave radiation cannot because it simply doesn't pack enough power to damage your DNA," says Gary Zeman of the Health Physics Society in McLean, Virginia.
Table 58: Russian Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Sterilization Systems & Equipment by Segment - Steam/ Autoclave, Ethylene Oxide, Gas Plasma, Gamma Radiation, E-Beam Radiation, Other Methods, and Sterilization Supplies Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Sales Figures in US$ Million for Years 2000 through 2010 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) III-52
Another Gamma radiation system is currently under construction by the private sector," he informed.
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Defentect DM3[TM] is an unmanned gamma radiation detection network that integrates data from a wide-area pervasive grid of threat-event sensors to an incident command center.
Contract notice: Procurement of portable instrument for the reference measurement of miljE[micro]dosekvivalentrat of gamma radiation in the environment.
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Gamma Knife is used to deliver stereotactic radiosurgery, a nonsurgical method of treating tumors and abnormalities in the head and neck with high-dose gamma radiation.
Gamma-ray bursts are violent bursts of gamma radiation associated with exploding massive stars.
Researchers have found hints that melanin--the same pigment that's the natural ultraviolet filter in people's skin--might enable these fungi to harness the energy of gamma radiation as well as to shield themselves from it.
Topics of the 22 invited talks include high-energy neutrino astronomy, the origin of galactic cosmic rays, the highest-energy cosmic rays, cosmic rays and gamma radiation from clusters of galaxies, gamma-ray blazars, non-thermal x-ray emission from supernova remnants, gamma-ray line astronomy, and neutrino telescopes.