gamma radiation


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gam·ma ra·di·a·tion

ionizing electromagnetic radiation resulting from nuclear processes, such as radioactive decay or fission.

gamma radiation

Etymology: Gk, gamma + L, radiare, to emit rays
a very-high-frequency form of electromagnetic radiation consisting of photons emitted by radioactive elements in the course of nuclear transition. The wavelength of gamma radiation is characteristic of the radioactive elements involved and ranges from about 4 × 10-10 to 5 × 10-13 m. Gamma radiation can penetrate thousands of meters of air and several centimeters of soft tissue and bone. It is more penetrating than alpha radiation and beta radiation but has less ionizing power and is not deflected in electric or magnetic fields. Like x radiation, gamma radiation can injure and destroy body cells and tissue, especially cell nuclei. However, controlled application of gamma radiation is important in the diagnosis and treatment of various conditions, including skin cancer and malignancies deep within the body. Also called gamma rays. See also x-ray.

radiation

The combined processes of emission, transmission and absorption of highly energetic waves and particles on the electromagnetic spectrum treatment to kill cancer cells. See Acute radiation injury, Alpha radiation, Background radiation, Chemoradiation, Coherent radiation, Corpuscular radiation, Definitive radiation, Electromagnetic radiation, External radiation, Gamma radiation, Grenz radiation, Implant radiation, Internal radiation, Ionizing radiation, Non-ionizing radiation, Remnant radiation, Scattered radiation, Synchrotron radiation, Total body irradiation Clinical practice The direct, band-like extension of a sensation, in particular of pain, from a point of origin to another region of the body. Cf Referred pain Oncology The administration of ionizing radiation to kill malignant tumor cells. See Radiation fibrosis, Radiation therapy.
Radiation  
Alpha radiation 2 protons and 2 neutrons, eg plutonium, radon; α radiation travels 15 cm in air and is stopped by a piece of paper; proven role in soft tissue malignancy–see Radium Dial company, relationship with epithelial malignancy is uncertain; it is present in cigarette smoke and may have an additive effect to the known carcinogenic effect of tar; emitted by radium, thorium, uranium.
Beta radiation Electrons, eg strontium-90, tritium–3H; β radiation travels at the speed of light, is stopped by wood and thin metals and is carcinogenic to skin
Gamma radiation Gamma photon A quantum of electromagnetic radiation of ≤ 1 nm, which is generated by unstable nuclei eg 60Co; γ radiation is stopped by several feet of heavy concrete or 10-40 cm of lead and is linked to cancer, inducing mutations at the glycophorin A locus in survivors of atomic blasts; 183/105 excess deaths in survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki blasts, with a 13-fold ↑ in non-lymphocytic leukemia–peaking at 6 yrs post-blast, thyroid nodules and tumors–peaking at 15-20 years post-blast and multiple myeloma 6-fold ↑–peaking 30 yrs post-blast

gam·ma ra·di·a·tion

(gam'ă rā'dē-ā'shŭn)
Ionizing electromagnetic radiation resulting from nuclear processes, such as radioactive decay or fission.

gamma radiation

Electromagnetic radiation of energy greater than several hundred thousand electron volts. With the development of very high voltage X-ray equipment there is now a technological overlap between X-ray and gamma radiation. Formerly, gamma was obtained only from decay of radioactive elements. Gamma radiation is highly penetrative and is valuable in RADIOTHERAPY.

gam·ma ra·di·a·tion

(gam'ă rā'dē-ā'shŭn)
Ionizing electromagnetic radiation resulting from nuclear processes, such as radioactive decay or fission.
References in periodicals archive ?
To the best of our knowledge, the cytotoxicity of soap and detergent wastewater has not been reported using allium cepa, haemolytic and brine shrimp bioassays and there is also lack of information whether UV and gamma radiation are efficient to degrade the pollutant in soap and detergent wastewater.
Exposure to natural gamma radiation was calculated as the sum of exposure to cosmic gamma radiation and terrestrial gamma radiation.
On the other hand, the group of rats that received silymarin (50 mg/kg/day) and exposed to gamma radiation showed an obvious reduction in hepatic MDA and XO activity with significant elevation in hepatic GSH content and the activity of SOD and CAT in compared to irradiated-rats.
After gamma radiation application, about 4 g of crushed seeds were extracted to Soxhlet apparatus using petroleum ether as solvent.
Fruits were then transported in a non-refrigerated truck to the Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture (CENA), University of Sao Paulo, Piracicaba, SP, for gamma radiation exposure.
The Co60 gamma radiation source from Pakistan Radiation Services (PARAS), Lahore (Pakistan), having dose rate 400Gy/hour was used for irradiation of the samples.
0 Mrad, carotenoids of orange juice are destroyed to the extent of 38 per cent, while those of mango pulp undergo a destruction by only 24 per cent induced great differ widely in their sensitivity to gamma radiation (Sawanta et al.
As Lively, who helped develop the gamma radiation process, explains, first aid products often undergo this treatment for sterilization because the energy particles can penetrate packaging to kill unwanted elements.
Hoses may be sterilized by autoclave, CIP, SIP, and gamma radiation processes.
GammaTag withstands gamma radiation up to 45 kGy (kilograys) and may also be sterilized using CIP processes.
Beta rays come from an e-beam generator, which provides the same features as gamma radiation but with reduced penetrating power.
Last year, Northridge became one of only about 100 hospitals nationwide to offer a state-of-the-art Gamma Knife Center that uses gamma radiation - rather than traditional surgery - to treat lesions or tumors in the brain.