gambling

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gambling

 [gamb´ling]
betting money or other valuables on the outcome of a game or other event.
pathological gambling an impulse control disorder consisting of persistent failure to resist the urge to gamble, to such an extent that personal, family, and vocational life are seriously disrupted.
An activity in which a person wagers against another person or organization on the likelihood of a particular outcome, either in a game of chance, a sports event or other activity for which the outcome is not known in advance

gambling

Vox populi An activity in which a person wagers against another person–eg, friend, acquaintance, bookmaker or 'bookie', or organization–eg, casino, horse race track, internet company engaged in said activity, either legal or illegal, on the likelihood of a particular outcome, either in a game of chance, or sports event or other activity for which the outcome is not known in advance. See Compulsive gambling.

gambling

1. Wagering or betting.
2. Risking something of value in the hope of winning something even more valuable or rare in exchange.

Patient discussion about gambling

Q. Do people substitute one addiction with another? If someone used to be addicted to alcohol and drugs, but is now clean for several months, is it likely that he will develop an addiction to something else (for example cigarettes or gambling)?

A. I'd just like to add my 2 cents worth: Addictive behavior transfers to just about anything; addiction is the problem. Just as addicts have to learn that alcohol is also a drug, we must recognize that addiction is the problem; it is the behavior that is the problem. A common thing for addicts to do is to stop using drugs (including alcohol) and to substitute with people instead, for example, to become involved in codependent relationships with others, or to recognize that their ongoing relationships may also be codependent. It's not uncommon for individuals to go to CoDA (Codependents Anonymous) in addition to AA/NA or GA(Gambler's Anonymous), MA (Marijuana Anonymous)...Others find it more beneficial to use one program (like NA, e.g.), while realizing that addiction refers to more than just a drug or substance.

More discussions about gambling
References in periodicals archive ?
One person noted, 'you are more likely to gamble when you are by yourself', and, 'staff from other venues .
But the massiveness of Morgan Stanley and the diversity of its investment activities didn't allow Gamble to focus as exclusively as he would have liked on real estate investment geared to a specific category of investor he felt was underserved; wealthy families and individuals.
In 1977, Philadelphia International Records, a music label and former BE 100 company, owned by Gamble and Huff, joined with CBS Records to launch an urban beautification program.
For me to reject the null hypothesis that religious affiliation does not affect the amount of money an individual sets out to gamble, I would have to find significant values for Lambda and [[chi].
The Procter & Gamble Professional Line includes more than 22 high-performance products that incorporate advanced cleaning technologies for bathrooms, hard surfaces, floors, pots and pans in foodservice and institutional cleaning environments.
A preoccupation with gambling such as reliving past gambling experiences, planning for future gambling events, and thinking of ways to get money with which to gamble.
Procter & Gamble agrees that olestra helps carry away fat-soluble vitamins such as A, D, E, and K.
In this article, the authors first summarize the decision in Procter & Gamble and then consider why it is unlikely the Supreme Court will reconsider or limit its holding in First Security Bank.
He encouraged people who attended the session not to gamble in order to boost their income, take money from the savings to gamble, chase gambling losses or sell their possessions in order to get money to gamble.
The Gamble Aware website plays an important role in achieving this and may be the first port of call for someone seeking help.
Shaffer, Hall, Walsh and Vander Bilt (1995) have examined some of the adverse consequences often faced by young people who gamble.
The typical casino is surrounded by pawn shops, "paycheck loan" services, and other institutions devoted to impulsive liquidation of personal and family assets by gambling addicts who, unlike Bill Bennett, often gamble away their family's "milk money.