galactosyltransferase


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galactosyltransferase

/ga·lac·to·syl·trans·fer·ase/ (gal″ak-to″sil-trans´fer-ās) any of a group of enzymes that transfer a galactose radical from a donor to an acceptor molecule.
References in periodicals archive ?
The gene makes an enzyme, alpha 1,3 galactosyltransferase, responsible for the overwhelming immune response that occurs when a pig's organ is placed inside a human.
For example, a specific surface molecule, alpha 1,3-galactose, is only available to detect mutations of alpha 1,3 galactosyltransferase and related genes.
Targeted disruption of the alpha1,3- galactosyltransferase gene in cloned pigs.
Kolber-Simonds, Production of alpha 1,3 galactosyltransferase null pigs by means of nuclear transfer with fibroblasts bearing loss of heterozygosity mutations.
Immune responses to alpha1,3 galactosyltransferase knockout pigs.
Galactosylceramide is galactosylated by a galactosyltransferase (UDP-galactose:ceramide galactosyltransferase) found exclusively in the ER, whereas the UDP-Gal transporter has mainly a Golgi localization.
086 beta 1,4- galactosyltransferase, polypeptide 1 lactalbumin, alpha- LALBA 0.
Transferrin hypoglycosylation in these patients may be attributable to direct inhibition of galactosyltransferase activity by the accumulated galactose 1-phosphate or to an effect on the formation of UDP-galactose, the donorsubstrate in the reaction (27).
Thus, Stibler and Borg (26) measured diminished activities of galactosyltransferase and N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase in serum from alcoholics.
Other than the deficiency of galactosyltransferase I involved in the assembly of glycosaminoglycans (52), WAS is the only genetic disease involving abnormal O-glycosylation identified at present.
He has solved the structures of numerous important proteins, including angiogenin and related ribonucleases, angiotensin-converting enzymes, bacterial toxins and superantigens, eosinophil-granule proteins, galactosyltransferases, Charcot-Leyden crystal protein, ct-Iactalbumin, glycogen phosphorylase, and foot-and-mouth disease virus; the first animal virus structure ever solved outside the United States.