galactopoietic

(redirected from galactogenic)
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ga·lac·to·poi·et·ic

(gă-lak'tō-poy-et'ik),
Pertaining to galactopoiesis.

galactopoietic

/ga·lac·to·poi·et·ic/ (-poi-et´ik)
1. pertaining to, marked by, or promoting milk production.
2. an agent that promotes milk flow.

galactopoietic

adjective Referring to the production of (breast) milk

ga·lac·to·poi·et·ic

(gă-lak'tō-poy-et'ik)
Pertaining to galactopoiesis.

galactopoietic

1. pertaining to, marked by, or promoting milk production.
2. an agent that promotes milk flow.
References in periodicals archive ?
In no other instance is a plant prescribed as a galactogenic food further subject to specific restriction by a clan or other group, nor are the names of the other prescribed plants applied to the groups in question--even though naming clans after plants is the single most common form of group nomenclature among Nage.
Indeed, the evidence shows that galactogenic custom differs at least as much by locality as by clan membership.
Similarly, Bitter gourd and rice are reported as the galactogenic food in the northeastern districts of Dhere-Isa, Gero and Rendu, while in R6ga, directly east of central Nage, the gourd is consumed with banana blossom.
The fact that segments of Nila and Mudi in desa Nage 'Oga continue to employ what is apparently the older galactogogue, Tete Kei, strongly suggests that these groups have changed to accord with the predominant galactogenic practice in their new locality.
The increasing disconnection of clanship and locality indicated by Nage oral history may well have heightened the competing tendency to patrifiliation and matrifiliation, as groups have increasingly been presented with a choice of maintaining galactogenic prescriptions associated with clan-mates resident in other settlements or following those of village-mates belonging to other clans with whom they have often intermarried.
Even though different clans often employ the same galactogenic foods while localized segments of a single clan frequently subscribe to different galactogogues, the fact that nursing prescriptions of a child's mother's and father's natal groups often differ provides an additional context for asserting the value of patrilineal clanship--including, of course, the precedence of clanship over current residential association, even in spite of a manifestly regional distribution of the prescriptions.
In these several respects, Nage statements representing galactogenic prescriptions as properties of patrilineal clans reveal a 'participants' view' of a social institution that is largely contradicted by a manifest state-of-affairs.
It may simply be a coincidence, but in the Wangka dialect of Rembong (a district well to the northwest of central Nage, in the administrative region of Manggarai) the term 'Sapa-Rea', or 'Sape-Rea', which palpably resembles Nage 'Hapa Hea', denotes the Bitter gourd, Momordica charantia (Verheijen 1977, 1984), the main constituent of the galactogenic recipe called 'Paga Pae'.
In addition, while Nage nursing prescriptions containing bitter plants and buffalo fat (kawu) accord with the Malay scheme as it applies to new mothers, salt and spice (chillies) are actually forbidden to Nage women consuming galactogenic foods.