futile care


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A medical intervention that does not lead to improvement in the patient’s prognosis, comfort, well-being, or general state of health

futile care

In clinical practice, esp. in the care of patients at the end of life, any intervention that will not improve a patient's health, well-being, comfort, or prognosis.
See: advance directive; hospice
See also: care
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References in periodicals archive ?
25] state that moral distress is caused by providing poor-quality or futile care, unsuccessful advocacy and unrealistic hope.
The situations or issues identified which caused moral distress were: perceived collegial incompetence or inexperience; a shortage of resources, particularly staff; poor communication and consultation practices; and concerns around EOL (maintaining futile care or withdrawing treatment, and support).
The relationship between moral distress and perception of futile care in the critical care unit.
Demands for futile care could be considered poor parental decision making, and consequently abusive.
Since a clear goal of medicine is to save lives, it only seems reasonable that physician-driven futile care is offered to avoid death as medical failure.
Then, is the use of futile care truly protective of the professional ethic?
Futile clinical care is delivered because it is ill-defined and the clinical decision making processes that lead to futile care are faulty.
For the last several years American hospitals have been quietly promulgating futile care protocols that empower their ethics committees to authorize doctors to unilaterally refuse wanted care.
Proponents of futile care theory often cite tube feeding for patients in a persistent vegetative state as an example of "futile" or "inappropriate" treatment.
The disability rights community has connected the dots between assisted suicide and futile care.
And although a physician may not be held liable for failing to provide futile care, whether he or she actually exercised proper judgment in a given case is a question a court may decide.
A glimpse at the ancient roots of modern medicine reveals that an older scientific tradition entertained a very different set of values--values that provide wise counsel and shed light on the specificf ethical concern of providing medically futile care to patients.