fusin


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fu·sin

(fyū'zin),
A G protein-linked receptor present on certain human cells that is thought to be required for HIV fusion with a target cell.
[fuse, fr. L. fundo, pp. fusum, to melt, + -in]

CXCR4

A gene on chromosome 2q21 that encodes a seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor belonging to the CXC chemokine receptor family, which binds specifically to stromal cell-derived factor-1, transducing a signal by increasing intracellular calcium ions and enhancing MAPK1/MAPK3 activation. It acts as a receptor for extracellular ubiquitin, is involved in haematopoiesis and in cardiac ventricular septum formation, plays a role in gastrointestinal tract vascularisation by regulating vascular branching and/or remodelling in endothelial cells, may be involved in cerebellar development and, in the CNS, may mediate hippocampal-neuron survival.

Molecular pathology
CXCR4 acts with the CD4 to support HIV entry into cells; it is highly expressed in breast cancer cells. CXCR4 mutations cause WHIM (warts, hypogammaglobulinaemia, infections, and myelokathexis) syndrome.

fu·sin

(fyū'zin)
A G protein-linked receptor present on certain human cells that is thought to be required for HIV fusion with a target cell.
[fuse, fr. L. fundo, pp. fusum, to melt, + -in]
References in periodicals archive ?
Other researchers hail the long-awaited identification of this protein, which Berger's group calls fusin, as a major advance in scientists' knowledge of HIV's life cycle.
By adding the genes for CD4 and fusin to animals such as rabbits, investigators also hope to create laboratory models in which they can study HIV infection.
In contrast, the discovery of fusin by Berger's group has so far garnered rave reviews.
They also hope to study whether HIV's interaction with fusin might explain how the virus kills immune cells, a fundamental question that remains a mystery.
In similar studies, investigators have now shown that SDF-1 can block the HIV strains that depend on fusin.
Like fusin, CC-CKR-5 is a receptor, a protein that normally binds to extracellular molecules and transmits signals into the cell.
Berger's group reported the discovery of fusin last month.
Doms' group has found at least one HIV strain that can infect cells using either fusin or CC-CKR-5.
Both fusin and CC-CKR-5 present tantalizing targets for drugs that would deny HIV access to cells, researchers agree.
Our research shows that a second molecule, fusin, is required for certain strains of HIV to fuse with and enter into cells.
Through a process of elimination that involved repeatedly dividing cell cultures to find the most blue cells, the researchers narrowed their search to one protein, fusin.
Berger said fusin helps HIV-1 infect white blood cells of the immune system called T-cells.