fur


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fur

(fŭr),
1. The coat of soft, fine hair of some mammals.
2. A layer of epithelial debris and fungal elements on the dorsum of the tongue. It is related more to neglected oral hygiene than to an underlying disease process.
[M.E. furre, fr. O.Fr., fr. Germanic]

fur

doraphobia.

fur

(fûr)
n.
1. The thick coat of soft hair covering the skin of certain mammals.
2. A furlike coating: fur on the tongue.
tr.v. furred, furring, furs
To cover or coat as if with fur.

FUR

Abbreviation for:
ferric-uptake regulation
follow-up report
freed-up resources 
furosemide

fur

soft, fine hair growing thickly on the skin of animals, mainly mammals, associated with heat retention.

fur

short, very fine and soft hair. Valuable as pelts for use in cold climate and high fashion garments.

fur animal
animals bred or trapped in the wild for their pelts. Includes mink, sable, otter, lapin, ermine, marten.
fur ball
accumulations of fur, swallowed during the natural grooming procedures of cats, can be a cause of vomiting, enteritis and uncommonly intestinal obstruction. Most troublesome in longhaired cats and those with skin disease that prompts more grooming.
fur-bearing animal
see fur animal (above).
fur clipping
chewing of fur by captive mink rendering the pelt useless. A vice apparently caused by cage boredom.
fur mite
see lynxacarusradovsky.
fur seal alopecia
caused in captive seals by overgrooming, a displacement activity. Alopecia occurs on the head and the posterior body, the easiest places for the seal to scratch.
References in classic literature ?
The American fur companies keep no established posts beyond the mountains.
The introduction of firearms has rendered them more successful hunters, but at the same time, more formidable foes; some of them, incorrigibly savage and warlike in their nature, have found the expeditions of the fur traders grand objects of profitable adventure.
The equestrian exercises, therefore, in which they are engaged, the nature of the countries they traverse, vast plains and mountains, pure and exhilarating in atmospheric qualities, seem to make them physically and mentally a more lively and mercurial race than the fur traders and trappers of former days, the self-vaunting "men of the north.
In one place a bit of the fur coat touched my cheek softly, but no forgiving hand came to rest on my bowed head.
The edges of the fur coat had fallen open and I was moved to turn away.
She was lying on her side, tranquil above the smooth flow of time, again closely wrapped up in her fur, her head resting on the old-gold sofa cushion bearing like everything else in that room the decoratively enlaced letters of her monogram; her face a little pale now, with the crimson lobe of her ear under the tawny mist of her loose hair, the lips a little parted, and her glance of melted sapphire level and motionless, darkened by fatigue.
But this time she kept away too long, and stayed beyond the half-hour; so she had not time to take off her fine dress, and threw her fur mantle over it, and in her haste did not blacken herself all over with soot, but left one of her fingers white.
When the king got to the bottom, he ordered Cat-skin to be called once more, and soon saw the white finger, and the ring that he had put on it whilst they were dancing: so he seized her hand, and kept fast hold of it, and when she wanted to loose herself and spring away, the fur cloak fell off a little on one side, and the starry dress sparkled underneath it.
he thought, feeling a cold shudder run down his back, and having fastened his fur coats again and wrapped himself up, he snuggled into a corner of the sledge intending to wait patiently.
And tucking the loose skirts of his fur coat in under his knees, he turned the horse and rode away from the sledge in the direction in which he thought the forest and the forester's hut must be.
It had taken Cherokee a long time to shift that grip upward, and this had also tended further to clog his jaws with fur and skin-fold.
Piccadilly was a stream of rapidly moving carriages, from which flashed furs and flowers and bright winter costumes.