funnel

(redirected from funnels)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

fun·nel

(fŭn'ĕl),
1. A hollow, conic vessel with a tube proceeding from its apex, used in pouring fluids from one container to another.
2. anatomy an infundibulum.

fun·nel

(fŭn'ĕl)
1. A hollow conic vessel with a tube of variable length proceeding from its apex, used in pouring fluids from one container to another, in filtering, and other tasks.
2. anatomy An infundibulum.

funnel

(fŭn′ĕl) [L. fundere, to pour]
A conical device open at both ends used to direct a fluid from the larger opening (at one end of the cone) to the smaller at the other.
References in periodicals archive ?
Funnel R/F evaluates and manages the impact of each element of the media plan based on its ability to move consumers to the next funnel stage.
Satern says the following about the funnels on their Web site: "Funnel will stay on the case without other support, powder flows into case without bridging, suitable for use with smokeless or black powder, as the funnel will not cause static sparks.
In hilly country, my favorite early-season funnels are the heads of steep gullies.
ALFRED Holt (1829 - 1911) revolutionised sea trade with his remarkable fleet of steam ships in what became known as the Blue Funnel Line.
has introduced a new fuel pre-filter funnel system.
Funnels might not run as straight as fence lines, but that presents no problem when the proper connections exist.
More importantly, I'm thoroughly convinced that hunting funnels offer better odds of success than any other single strategy.
As the tornadoes whirled faster, the pressure inside their funnels dropped.
These funnels simplify water system monitoring and reduce the risk of sample contamination by combining a filter funnel and sample cup in one easy-to-use product.
No matter what your forte is when it comes to hunting wary white tails, if bad luck is your only luck, seek out bottlenecks, ridges, saddles, and other natural funnels to up your odds.
Loic Vanel of the University of Pierre and Marie Curie in Paris and his colleagues measured pressures beneath piles made either by pouring sand through funnels or letting it rain through sieves.
Plus, individual twisters can split into three or four separate funnels that can hit the same structure all at once.