funnel


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fun·nel

(fŭn'ĕl),
1. A hollow, conic vessel with a tube proceeding from its apex, used in pouring fluids from one container to another.
2. anatomy an infundibulum.

fun·nel

(fŭn'ĕl)
1. A hollow conic vessel with a tube of variable length proceeding from its apex, used in pouring fluids from one container to another, in filtering, and other tasks.
2. anatomy An infundibulum.

funnel

(fŭn′ĕl) [L. fundere, to pour]
A conical device open at both ends used to direct a fluid from the larger opening (at one end of the cone) to the smaller at the other.
References in periodicals archive ?
executive of Red Funnel Kevin George, chairman and chief executive of Red Funnel, said: "After a competitive tender, we are delighted to place our third new-build in succession with a UK yard.
Funnel shape and hydrophobic material minimize residue and maximize sample volume
Benny Traub, founder of Golden Funnel Marketing, said, "We are proud to have Shanee on the team.
The sole difference between a funnel cloud and a tornado is that the latter touches the ground, typically resulting in some property damage, meteorologist Colby Neuman said.
Invert the top of the bottle, and you'll now have an oil funnel that fits perfectly into most cars.
If the middle of your funnel is empty, you actually have a top-of-the-funnel problem.
Conversion funnel is a technical term used in e-commerce operations to describe the track a consumer takes through an Internet advertising or search system, navigating an e-commerce web site and finally converting to a sale.
The Sun Funnel is largely based on the Sun Gun, which was briefly described in this magazine's June 1999 issue, page 126.
The funnel cloud was seen in Great Ayton by healthcare workers Vicki Allinson and Nicola Moffitt.
M2 EQUITYBITES-March 3, 2011-J & J Snack Foods's customer to discontinue funnel cake fries purchase(C)2011 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.
A team of researchers has proposed adding a laser and an ion funnel to a widely used scientific instrument, the mass spectrometer, to analyze the surfaces of rocks and other samples directly on the Red Planet.
Enge (2001) reported that funnel traps could be used as the sole trapping method, except when looking for fossorial and semi-fossorial squamates that are caught more frequently in pitfall traps.