fungi

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Fungi

 [fun´ji]
in the classification of living organisms, one of the kingdoms of eukaryotic organisms; see fungus.

fungi

 [fun´ji] (L.)
plural of fungus.

Fun·gi

(fŭn'jī),
A kingdom of eukaryotic organisms that grow in irregular masses, without roots, stems, or leaves, and are devoid of chlorophyll or other pigments capable of photosynthesis. Each organism (thallus) is unicellular to filamentous, and possesses branched somatic structures (hyphae) surrounded by cell walls containing glucan or chitin or both, and containing true nuclei. They reproduce sexually or asexually (spore formation), and may obtain nutrition from other living organisms as parasites or from dead organic matter as saprobes (saprophytes).
See also: kingdom.
[L. fungus, a mushroom]

fun·gi

(fŭn'jī), Avoid the mispronunciation fung'gī.
Plural of fungus.

Fungi

/Fun·gi/ (fun´ji) [L.] a kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live as saprobes or parasites, including mushrooms, yeasts, and molds; they have rigid cell walls but lack chlorophyll.

fungi

/fun·gi/ (fun´ji) [L.] plural of fungus.

Fungi

[fun′ji]
in the classification of living organisms, one of the kingdoms of eukaryotic organisms. See also fungus .

fungi

Plural of fungus.

splenomegaly

Enlarged spleen Enlargement of spleen for any reason, which is usually a manifestation of underlying disease; the only specific finding in splenomegaly is dragging sensation in the upper right quadrant; megalic spleens may reach 4.0+ kg–eg, in agnogenic myeloid metaplasia
Splenomegaly
Congestion Cirrhosis, CHF, thrombosis of portal or splenic veins
Infection
• Bacteria Brucellosis, infective carditis agents, syphilis, TB, typhoid fever
• Fungi Histoplasmosis
• Parasites Echinococcosis, leishmaniasis, malaria, schistosomiasis, toxoplasmosis, trypanosomiasis
• Viruses CMV, EBV
Inflammatory/immune-related Rheumatoid arthritis, SLE
Hematopoietic disease/Lymphoid function
• Malignant Leukemias, eg ALL, CLL, myeloproliferative disorders–eg agnogenic myeloid metaplasia, CML, multiple myeloma, polycythemia vera; lymphomas–Hodgkin's disease, NHL
• Nonmalignant Hemolytic anemia, histiocytosis, ITP
Storage diseases Gaucher's disease, mucopolysaccharidosis, Niemann-Pick disease
Etc Amyloidosis, cysts, hypersplenism, metastases, primary tumors

Fun·gi

(fŭn'jī)
A division of eukaryotic organisms that grow in irregular masses, without roots, stems, or leaves, and are devoid of chlorophyll or other pigments capable of photosynthesis. Each organism (thallus) is unicellular to filamentous and possesses branched somatic structures (hyphae) surrounded by cell walls containing cellulose or chitin or both, and containing true nuclei. They reproduce sexually or asexually (spore formation), and may obtain nutrition from other living organisms as parasites or from dead organic matter as saprobes (saprophytes).
[L. fungus, a mushroom]

fun·gi

(fŭng'jī)
Plural of fungus.

Fungi

(fŭn′jī) [L. fungus, mushroom]
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FUNGI
The kingdom of organisms that includes yeasts, molds, and mushrooms. Fungi grow as single cells, as in yeast, or as multicellular filamentous colonies, as in molds and mushrooms. They do not contain chlorophyll, so they are saprophytic (obtain food from dead organic matter) or parasitic (obtain nourishment from living organisms). Most fungi are not pathogenic, and the body's normal flora contains many fungi. See: illustration

Fungi that cause disease come from a group called fungi imperfecti. In immunocompetent humans they cause minor infections of the hair, nails, mucous membranes, or skin. In a person with a compromised immune system due to AIDS or immunosuppressive drug therapy, fungi are a source of opportunistic infections that can cause death.

illustration

fungi

A large group of spore-bearing organisms that derive their nourishment by decomposing non-living organic matter and absorbing nutrients through their surface (saprophytic activity). Many fungi can infect the body but, in people with healthy immune systems, infection tends to be limited to the epidermis of the skin and the mucous membranes of the genital tract. Malnourishment and poor living conditions predispose to deeper fungus infections following penetrating injuries to the feet and other parts. Immune deficiency allows widespread opportunistic fungus infections of all parts of the body.

fungi

plant species which do not show photosynthesis, chlorophyll, roots or stems, leaves or flowers, but grow in irregular, thread-like masses (mycelium) and are capable of both sexual and asexual reproduction, and spore formation

fungi

[L.] plural of fungus.

Patient discussion about fungi

Q. How to treat toenail fungus? I have two badly infected toes on one foot (a problem of several years) and two more are growing in with fungus. How can I treat it without oral medicine?

A. there are topical treatments for fungus. but first of all- avoid humidity as much as you can. air it up and use Clotrimazole or Miconazole both topical. it'll take you about 6 months of 2-3 times a day of cleaning and applying cream to get rid of it.
good luck!!

Q. How to treat toenail fungus? I have two badly infected toes on one foot (a problem of several years) and two more are growing in with fungus. How can I treat it without oral medicine?

A. fungal infection sometimes can be tricky. if it happens often, consider to check your blood glucose level (diabetic people tends to be vulnerable to a development of fungus).

agree with dominicus, apply some anti-fungal (ketoconazole) cream on it, and manage as best as you can to prevent much moisture in that area. and make sure you wash your daily socks, hehe..
you can also have the cure more quickly by also consuming oral anti-fungal (why don't you want to consume it?)

okay, good luck, and stay healthy always..

Q. what natural cure for toe nail fungus really works?

A. Haven't heard about anything natural that was actually provent in reliable, well controlled trial. Especially since natural medications usually aren't tested in this way, I'm not sure there can be an accurate and true answer for this question.

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