hypertrophy

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hypertrophy

 [hi-per´tro-fe]
increase in volume of a tissue or organ produced entirely by enlargement of existing cells. See also hyperplasia and proliferation. adj., adj hypertro´phic.
asymmetrical septal hypertrophy
2. the term is sometimes limited to cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in which the hypertrophy is localized to the interventricular septum. See also hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.
benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) age-associated enlargement of the prostate resulting from proliferation of glandular and stromal elements, beginning generally in the fifth decade of life; it may cause urethral compression and obstruction. Called also benign prostatic hyperplasia and nodular hyperplasia of the prostate.
cardiac hypertrophy enlargement of myocardial cells and hyperplasia of nonmuscular cardiac components due to pressure and volume overload and sometimes to neurohumoral factors.
compensatory hypertrophy that which results from an increased workload due to some physical defect, such as in an organ where one part is defective, or in one kidney when the other is absent or nonfunctional.
functional hypertrophy hypertrophy of an organ or part caused by its increased activity.
ventricular hypertrophy hypertrophy of the myocardium of a ventricle, due to chronic pressure overload; it is manifest electrocardiographically by increased QRS complex voltage, frequently accompanied by repolarization changes.

hy·per·tro·phy

(hī-pĕr'trō-fē),
General increase in bulk of a part or organ, not due to tumor formation. Use of the term may be restricted to denote greater bulk through increase in size, but not in number, of cells or other individual tissue elements. Compare: hyperplasia.
Synonym(s): hypertrophia
[hyper- + G. trophē, nourishment]

hypertrophy

/hy·per·tro·phy/ (hi-per´tro-fe) enlargement or overgrowth of an organ or part due to increase in size of its constituent cells.hypertro´phic
asymmetrical septal hypertrophy  (ASH) hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, sometimes specifically that in which the hypertrophy is localized to the interventricular septum.
benign prostatic hypertrophy  see under hyperplasia.
ventricular hypertrophy  hypertrophy of the myocardium of a ventricle, due to chronic pressure overload.

hypertrophy

(hī-pûr′trə-fē)
n. pl. hypertro·phies
A nontumorous enlargement of an organ or a tissue as a result of an increase in the size rather than the number of constituent cells: muscle hypertrophy.
intr. & tr.v. hypertro·phied, hypertro·phying, hypertro·phies
To grow or cause to grow abnormally large.

hy′per·tro′phic (-trō′fĭk, -trŏf′ĭk) adj.

hypertrophy

[hīpur′trəfē]
Etymology: Gk, hyper + trophe, nourishment
an increase in the size of an organ caused by an increase in the size of the cells rather than the number of cells. The cells of the heart and kidney are particularly prone to hypertrophy. Kinds of hypertrophy include adaptive hypertrophy, compensatory hypertrophy, Marie's hypertrophy, physiological hypertrophy, and unilateral hypertrophy. Also called overgrowth. Compare atrophy, auxesis, hyperplasia. hypertrophic, adj.

hy·per·tro·phy

(hī-pĕr'trŏ-fē)
General increase in bulk of a part or organ, due to increase in size, but not in number, of the individual tissue elements.
See also: hyperplasia
[hyper- + G. trophē, nourishment]

hypertrophy

An increase in the size of a tissue or organ caused by enlargement of the individual cells. Hypertrophy is usually a normal response to an increased demand as in the case of the increase in muscle bulk due to sustained hard exercise. Compare HYPERPLASIA.

hypertrophy

the excessive growth or development of an organ or tissue.

Hypertrophy

A technical term for enlargement, as in BPH (benign prostatic hypertrophy).

hypertrophy

the enlargement or overgrowth of an organ or tissue due to an increase in size of its constituent cells. For example, the increase in bulk of skeletal muscles with training: the individual cells (muscle fibres) become larger. (To be distinguished from hyperplasia in which bulk is increased by cell division.)

hypertrophy

generalized increase in bulk (see hyperplasia)

hypertrophy (hīˈ·per·trōˑ·fē),

n increased size of a tissue or cells not attributable to cell division.
Enlarge picture
Hypertrophy.

hy·per·tro·phy

(hī-pĕr'trŏ-fē)
General increase in bulk of a part or organ, not due to tumor formation.
[hyper- + G. trophē, nourishment]

hypertrophy (hīpur´trōfē),

n an enlargement or overgrowth of an organ or part resulting from an increase in size of its constituent cells.
hypertrophy, denture,
hypertrophy, muscle,
n a hypertrophy denotes an increase in the size or number of constituent fibers of a muscle. Any other condition such as inflammation, tumor, and fatty infiltration that increases the size of a muscle is called
pseudohypertrophy. True or physiologic hypertrophy results from excessive activity of muscle. Genetic and hormonal factors play a role in determining the size of muscles; e.g., muscles in a man tend to be larger than in a woman in the temporal and facial regions. The histologic characteristics of hypertrophied muscle are normal. The fibrils are slightly wider in diameter than is normal, and the only change might be a slight increase in vascularity.

hypertrophy

increase in volume of a tissue or organ produced entirely by enlargement of existing cells.

brown hypertrophy of cere
cere hypertrophy.
ventricular hypertrophy
hypertrophy of the myocardium of a ventricle, causing abnormal deviation of the axis of the electrocardiogram.

Patient discussion about hypertrophy

Q. I have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and an ICD. Is it possible to get breast implants with an ICD? I have no further symptoms: I workout and run 6 days a week, in good shape and only 27 years old.

A. Some medical equipment can damage your ICD If you are visiting your doctor , tell him or her that you have an ICD BEFORE they do any testing or treatment.i'm pretty sure they'll find a creative way to do the implant.any way- before doing any procedure- ask the cardiologist that handles you about it.

Q. When should the tonsils and/or adenoids should be removed?

A. Currently the tonsillectomy is recommended in the presence of 6 episodes of throat infection (Group A strep pharyngitis) in one year or 3-4 episodes in each of 2years. Adenoidectomy may be recommended when tympanostomy tube surgery (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tympanostomy_tube) failed to prevent ear infection.

Another thing to consider is the presence of oral breathing - the constant use of the mouth for breathing in small children may lead to malformation of the facial bones that would necessitate more extensive surgeries later in life.

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