full-time equivalent


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full-time equivalent

A calculation used by an enterprise (e.g., free-standing health clinics, hospitals) to determine its labour needs, defined as the total hours worked (usually understood to mean by workers in non-managerial roles) divided by the average annual hours worked in full-time jobs.
References in periodicals archive ?
9 percent growth in full-time equivalent employees between 2002 and 2007.
If your business employs 50 or more full-time equivalent employees and is self-insured, you need to file Form 1095-C Parts I, II and III.
Michigan had the largest percentage decline in state and local government full-time equivalent employment between 2007 and 2012 (8.
A report to the panel explains that the number of admin staff will drop from a full-time equivalent of 750 in January 2010 to 540.
The report showed that the grid modernization program supported 954 full-time equivalent positions, including 282 at the utility and 671 with its contractors.
The state average full-time equivalent funding in the Higher Education Department's recommendations is $4,051.
Wirral University Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, which is cutting 682 full-time equivalent posts between 2010 and 2013.
I am referring to a significant discrepancy in the number of pupils per full-time equivalent teacher.
9, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- ComEd announced that work related to the Smart Grid program resulted in more than 3,000 full-time equivalent jobs in the second quarter of 2013.
Noncredit courses are funded by the state at $2,000 per full-time equivalent student.
That translates to $116 million in annual savings and the transfer of nearly 3,000 full-time equivalent jobs abroad for the typical Fortune 500 company, Hackett says.
It calls for reductions in a number of departments, totaling 154 FTEs (or full-time equivalent positions),'' Fox said.