period

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period

 [pēr´e-od]
an interval or division of time; the time for the regular recurrence of a phenomenon.
absolute refractory period the part of the refractory period from phase 0 to approximately −60 mV during phase 3; during this time it is impossible for the myocardium to respond with a propagated action potential, even with a strong stimulus. Called also effective refractory period.
blanking period a period of time during and after a pacemaker stimulus when the unstimulated chamber is insensitive to avoid sensing the electronic event in the stimulated chamber.
effective refractory period absolute refractory period.
ejection period the second phase of ventricular systole (0.21 to 0.30 sec), between the opening and closing of the semilunar valves, while the blood is discharged into the aorta and pulmonary artery. Called also sphygmic period.
gestation period see gestation period.
incubation period see incubation period.
isoelectric period the moment in muscular contraction when no deflection of the galvanometer is produced.
latency period
latent period a seemingly inactive period, as that between exposure to an infection and the onset of illness (incubation period) or that between the instant of stimulation and the beginning of response (latency, def. 2).
refractory period the period of depolarization and repolarization of the cell membrane after excitation; during the first portion (absolute refractory period), the nerve or muscle fiber cannot respond to a second stimulus, whereas during the relative refractory period it can respond only to a strong stimulus.
relative refractory period the part of the refractory period from approximately −60 mV during phase 3 to the end of phase 3; during this time a depressed response to a strong stimulus is possible.
safe period the period during the menstrual cycle when conception is considered least likely to occur; it comprises approximately the ten days after menstruation begins and the ten days preceding menstruation. See the section on fertility awareness methods, under contraception.
sphygmic period ejection period.
supernormal period in electrocardiography, a period at the end of phase 3 of the action potential during which activation can be initiated with a milder stimulus than is required at maximal repolarization, because at this time the cell is excitable and closer to threshold than at maximal diastolic potential.
vulnerable period that time at the peak of the T wave during which serious arrhythmias are likely to result if a stimulus occurs.
Wenckebach's period a usually repetitive sequence seen in partial heart block, marked by progressive lengthening of the P–R interval; see also dropped beat.

per·i·od

(pēr'ē-ŏd),
1. A certain duration or division of time.
See also: stage, phase.
2. One of the stages of a disease, for example, period of incubation, period of convalescence.
See also: stage, phase.
3. Colloquialism for menses.
4. Any of the horizontal rows of chemical elements in the periodic table.
[G. periodos, a way round, a cycle, fr. peri, around, + hodos, way]

period

/pe·ri·od/ (pēr´e-od) an interval or division of time.
ejection period  the second phase of ventricular systole, being the interval between the opening and closing of the semilunar valves, during which the blood is discharged into the aortic and pulmonary arteries; it is divided into a p. of rapid ejection followed by a p. of reduced ejection.
gestation period  the duration of pregnancy, in humans being about 266 days (38 weeks) from the time of fertilization until birth. In obstetrics, it is instead considered to begin on the first day of the woman's last normal menstrual period prior to fertilization, thus being about 280 days (40 weeks).
incubation period 
1. the interval of time required for development.
2. the interval between the receipt of infection and the onset of the consequent illness or the first symptoms of the illness.
3. the interval between the entrance into a vector of an infectious agent and the time at which the vector is capable of transmitting the infection.
latency period 
2. see under stage.
latent period  a seemingly inactive period, as that between exposure to an infection and subsequent illness, or that between the instant of stimulation and the beginning of response.
menstrual period , monthly period the time of menstruation.
pacemaker refractory period  the period immediately following either pacemaker sensing or pacing, during which improper inhibition of the pacemaker by inappropriate signals is prevented by inactivation of pacemaker sensing.
refractory period  the period of depolarization and repolarization of the cell membrane after excitation; during the first portion (absolute refractory p.), the nerve or muscle fiber cannot respond to a second stimulus, whereas during the relative refractory period, it can respond only to a strong stimulus.
safe period  the period during the menstrual cycle when conception is considered least likely to occur; it is approximately the ten days after menstruation begins and the ten days preceding menstruation.
sphygmic period  ejection p.
Wenckebach period  the steadily lengthening P–R interval occurring in successive cardiac cycles in Wenckebach block.

period

[pir′ē·od]
1 an interval of time.
2 one of the stages of a disease.
3 (in physics) the duration of a single cycle of a periodic wave or event.
4 See menses.

menstrual flow

The endometrial tissue that sloughs monthly during menstruation, from menarche to menopause, which lasts for 2–7 days and ranges from 10 to 80 ml in volume.

period

Vox populi A discrete time frame. See Accumulation period, Blanking period, Collection period, Critical period, Crystallization period, Eligibility period, Golden period, Grant budget period, Honeymoon period, Incubation period, Infectious period, Initial eligibility period, Last menstrual period, Latency period, NREMS period, Off period, Open enrollment period, Postoperative period, Pre-ejection period, Pre-patent period, Probationary period, Project period, Refractory period, REMS period, Sleep stage period, Sleep-onset REMS period, Total sleep period, Waiting period, Window period.

per·i·od

(pēr'ē-ŏd)
1. A certain duration or division of time.
2. One of the stages of a disease, e.g., period of incubation, period of convalescence.
See also: stage, phase
3. Colloquialism for menses.
4. Any of the horizontal rows of chemical elements in the periodic table.
[G. periodos, a way round, a cycle, fr. peri, around, + hodos, way]

period

See MENSTRUAL PERIOD.

per·i·od

(pēr'ē-ŏd)
1. A certain duration or division of time.
2. One of the stages of a disease.
[G. periodos, a way round, a cycle, fr. peri, around, + hodos, way]

Patient discussion about period

Q. i just have my period last november 25 and ended on 28.when is my possible fertile and ovulation period please help me identify my fertile and ovulation period

A. If someone knew it, it'd solve the human race many problems with fertility. The problem is that ovulation (and thus, the period of possible fertility) happens 14 days BEFORE the onset of menses, so you know about it only retrospectively.

However there ways such as serial body temperature measuring, along with kits that measures the level of hormones in the urine in order to estimate the time of the coming ovulation, and help in timing intercourse.

You may read more about it here (www.mayoclinic.com/health/ovulation-signs/AN01521 ) but anyway, consulting a doctor (e.g. gynecologist) may be wise.

Q. can you get pregnant on your period? i know that you get pregnant when you ovulate and you ovulate in the middle of your menstration cycle, but people have told me that you can get pregnant on your period. can somebody help me out???

A. It's possible, if your menses are long enough and your period is short enough, since semen can survive (and fertilize the ova) up to 3 days after intercourse. It's not common, but also not impossible. That's why the safe-days method isn't very effective in preventing pregnancy.

Q. how should i support my wife during this tough period?

A. first of all don't call it a tough period. a happy period might work better. although the wife can get annoyed by it. but she'll get annoyed from anything... just try to make her comfortable. foot massage , bubble baths, movies and popcorn.
it really depends on what kind of person is she and what she likes or not.

congratulations!

More discussions about period
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