fulguration

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fulguration

 [ful″gu-ra´shun]
destruction of living tissue by electric sparks generated by a high-frequency current.
direct fulguration that in which an insulated electrode with a metal point is connected to the uniterminal and an electric spark is allowed to impinge on the area being treated.
indirect fulguration that in which the patient is connected directly by a metal handle to the uniterminal and the operator uses an active electrode to complete an arc from the patient.

ful·gu·ra·tion

, direct fulgurationindirect fulguration (ful'gŭ-rā'shŭn),
Destruction of tissue by means of a high-frequency electric current: direct fulguration uses an insulated electrode with a metal point, which is connected to the uniterminal of the high-frequency apparatus, from which a spark of electricity is allowed to impinge on the area to be treated; indirect fulguration involves directly connecting the patient by a metal handle to the uniterminal and using an active electrode to complete an arc from the patient.
[L. fulgur, lightning stroke]

fulguration

fulguration

The controlled surgical destruction of tissue by fulguration (using high-frequency electric current), in particular at margins of a malignancy.

fulguration

Surgery Destroying tissue with an electric current; cauterization. See Electrocauterization.

ful·gu·ra·tion

(ful'gŭr-ā'shŭn)
Destruction of tissue by means of a high-frequency electric current: direct fulguration uses an insulated electrode with a metal point, which is connected to the uniterminal of the high-frequency apparatus, from which a spark of electricity is allowed to impinge on the area to be treated; indirect fulguration involves directly connecting the patient by a metal contact to the uniterminal and utilizing an active electrode to complete an arc from the patient.
[L. fulgur, lightning stroke]

fulguration

Destruction of tissue by DIATHERMY.

fulguration

high-frequency electric current tissue destruction (hyfrecation probe is held just above the lesion, allowing electrical energy to arc from probe tip to skin surface) Table 1
Table 1: Caustic agents used in podiatric practice to achieve local tissue destruction
AgentActionSpecial precautionsContraindications
Monochloroacetic acid (crystals or saturated solution) e.g. single VPKeratolytic; hydrolysing agent
Non-self-limiting
Deep penetration
Painful
Do not use mask if applying solution
Use a mask if applying crystals
Review in 5-7 days
Neutralize with foot bath ± NaHCO3 or NaCl
Soft-tissue atrophy
Peripheral vascular disease
Sensory neuropathy
Salicylic acid paste (40-70%) e.g. single VP; plantar hard cornKeratolytic; hydrolysing agentMacerates tissues
Review in 7-14 days
May be used in conjunction with monochloroacetic acid crystals
Neutralize with foot bath ± NaHCO3 or NaCl
Soft-tissue atrophy
Peripheral vascular disease
Sensory neuropathy
Pyrogallic acid e.g. single VPKeratolytic; oxidizing agentDeep penetration
Review in 3-5 days
Prolonged caustic action
Do not apply more than 3 times sequentially
Stains skin black/brown
Use with great care: may cause deep tissue breakdown
Soft-tissue atrophy
Peripheral vascular disease
Sensory neuropathy
Trichloroacetic acid (saturated solution; 10% solution) e.g. mosaic VPMild keratolytic
Protein precipitant
Shallow penetration
Neutralize with foot bath ± NaHCO3 or NaCl
Review in 3 weeks
Peripheral vascular disease
Sensory neuropathy
Silver nitrate (70% solution; 75-95% stick) e.g. mosaic VP; as a protective skin application below a maskProtein precipitant
Self-limiting
Stains skin black/brown
Maximum effect occurs within 24 hours
Some patients show hypersensitivity to silver nitrate (or experience acute pain)
Neutralize with NaCl foot bath
May be applied in alternate layers with trichloroacetic acid
Peripheral vascular disease
Known sensitivity
Potassium hydroxide (KOH; 85% pellets)Strong keratolyticPotentially deep penetration
Action of KOH stopped by application of 5% acetic acid after macerated coagulum has been removed
Single treatment
Soft-tissue atrophy
Peripheral vascular disease
Sensory neuropathy
Phenol (80% solution or 100% crystal)Protein precipitateAction retarded by flooding with industrial methylated spirit
Skin overspill flooded with glycerine
Review as per postoperative protocol
Peripheral vascular disease (phenol suppresses inflammatory response)

VP, verruca pedis.

ful·gu·ra·tion

(ful'gŭr-ā'shŭn)
Destruction of tissue by means of a high-frequency electric current: direct fulguration uses an insulated electrode with a metal point, which is connected to the uniterminal of the high-frequency apparatus, from which a spark of electricity is allowed to impinge on the area to be treated; indirect fulguration involves directly connecting the patient by a metal contact to the uniterminal and utilizing an active electrode to complete an arc from the patient.
[L. fulgur, lightning stroke]

fulguration (ful´gyərā´shən),

n the destruction of soft tissue by an electric spark that jumps the gap from an electrode to the tissue without the electrode touching the tissue. See also electrocoagulation.

fulguration

destruction of living tissue by electric sparks generated by a high-frequency current.