frustule

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frustule

(frŭs′cho͞ol, -tyo͞ol)
n.
The hard, siliceous bivalve shell of a diatom.

frustule

the hard, silica-containing wall of a DIATOM.
References in periodicals archive ?
As we counted only living cells, we can assume that a substantial part of the measured BSi, especially during May-August, originated from empty frustules of diatoms that were overlooked during the counting procedure and were kept in water by the turbulent flow.
EPP diatom frustules and muscle, gonad, gill and liver tissues of two fishes, Alburnus escherichii and Gobio sakaryaensis) components of system and by using some statistical techniques.
Natural counting units were defined as one unit for each colony, filament, diatom frustule (regardless if colonial or filamentous) or unicellular algae.
The frustules were then resuspended in 1 ml of deionized, distilled water and transferred to a coverslip (DIC), stub (SEM) or grid (TEM) for examination.
The taxonomic study of the species was based on examination of the cells and frustules.
The diatomite in Leekovo mire and Torvala is an exception, consisting almost entirely of diatomic frustules (Thomson 1937).
The surprisingly detailed and delicate structure of the frustules could be seen with the optical instrumentation commonly available in the 19th century.
tigrinus gut contents in late August-early September demonstrated the presence of empty diatom frustules of A.
Because filter-feeding zooplankton are concerned only with the size of their food and graze phytoplankton almost indiscriminately, indigestible coccoliths and diatom frustules are concentrated in their fecal pellets.
Filamentous algae and diatoms were identified by the presence of algal cells or frustules, either full or empty.
It has also been suggested that the teak of testate amoebae living in the plankton is composed of particles similar to grains of sand and frustules of diatoms to better adapt themselves to environmental dynamics and protection to re-suspension promoted by the lotic flow (MIRANDA; GOMES, 2013).