frustration-aggression hypothesis


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frus·tra·tion-·ag·gres·sion hy·poth·e·sis

the theory that frustration may lead to aggression, but that aggression is always the result of some form of frustration.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the frustration-aggression hypothesis is correct, then all "bright" students who are ignored by the teacher will become angry.
Shinar (1998) proposes that according to the frustration-aggression hypothesis (Dollard et al.
The frustration-aggression hypothesis (Dollard, Doob, Muller, Mourer, & Sears, (1939) has emerged as one of the most controversial models of aggression in the past several decades (e.
The first explanation may be offered in terms of frustration-aggression hypothesis (Dollard, Doob, Miller, Mowrer, & Sears, 1939).
This study was guided by the revised frustration-aggression hypothesis proposed by Berkowitz (1989), in which it is stated that a stressful work environment is a precursor of direct or displaced aggression towards others.