habit

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habit

 [hab´it]
1. an action that has become automatic or characteristic by repetition.
2. predisposition; bodily temperament.

hab·it

(hab'it),
1. An act, behavioral response, practice, or custom established in one's repertoire by frequent repetition of the same activity.
See also: addiction.
2. A basic variable in the study of conditioning and learning used to designate a new response learned either by association or by being followed by a reward or reinforced event.
[L. habeo, pp. habitus, to have]

habit

/hab·it/ (hab´it)
1. an action which has become automatic or characteristic by repetition.
2. predisposition or bodily temperament.

habit

(hăb′ĭt)
n.
a. A recurrent, often unconscious pattern of behavior that is acquired through frequent repetition: made a habit of going to bed early.
b. An established disposition of the mind or character: a pessimistic habit.
c. Customary manner or practice: an early riser by habit.
d. An addiction, especially to a narcotic drug.

habit

Etymology: L, habitus, condition
1 a customary or particular practice, manner, or mode of behavior.
2 an involuntary pattern of behavior or thought.
3 colloquial, the habitual use of drugs or narcotics. See also habit spasm, habit training, habitus.

habit

Vox populi A practice routinely or regularly performed by a person. See Bad habit, Good habit, Oral parafunctional habit.

hab·it

(hab'it)
1. An act, behavioral response, practice, or custom established in one's repertoire by frequent repetition of the same act.
See also: addiction
2. A basic variable in the study of conditioning and learning used to designate a new response learned either by association or by being followed by a reward or reinforced event.
See: conditioning, learning
3. An autonomic behavior integrated into a more complex pattern to function on a daily basis.
[L. habeo, pp. habitus, to have]

habit

A predictable sequence of reactions to common stimuli or behaviour occurring in particular contexts. Habits are conditioned, are often performed automatically and unconsciously, and avoid the need for decision-making.

habit

the general appearance and form of branching in plants. For example, dandelions can have an erect or prostrate habit, depending on location. See PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY.

Habit

Referring to the particular set of physical and mental tensions present in any individual.
Mentioned in: Alexander Technique

habit

(1) a tendency to behave in a certain way; (2) a well-learned behavioural response associated with a particular stimulus or situation, typically evoked without conscious intention.

hab·it

(hab'it)
An act, behavioral response, practice, or custom established in one's repertoire by frequent repetition of the same activity.
[L. habeo, pp. habitus, to have]

habit,

n the tendency toward an act that has become a repeated performance, relatively fixed, consistent, easy to perform, and almost automatic. Once learned, habits may occur without the intent of the person or may appear to be out of control and are difficult to change. In dentistry, habits such as bruxism, clenching, tongue thrusting, and lip and cheek biting may produce injury to the teeth, their attachment apparatus, oral mucosa, mandibular and temporomandibular musculature, and articulation.

habit

1. an action that has become automatic or characteristic by repetition.
2. predisposition; bodily temperament.

Patient discussion about habit

Q. Alcoholism becomes a habit in person? How does alcoholism becomes a habit in person?

A. If you think about alcohol all the time and you need it to feel good then it's a problem. If it's just a rare but pleasant action then there is no big disaster.
It may be a problem if the alcohol being the cause of depending (physical or corporial it is not just the same!)

Q. I am trying my best to reduce my habit towards drugs. I am trying my best to reduce my habit towards drugs. I got many advices to stay away from hard drugs. What's the difference between 'hard' and 'soft' drugs?

A. No difference

Q. is red meat bad for you??? and what about white meat like pork??? why is consider to be healthy eating vegie what are the advantages of this kind of diet ?

A. Eating a lot of red meat is considered to be a risk factor for developing colon cancer, and therefore it is advised not to eat too much of it. On the other hand, a diet rich with vegetables and fruit is considered very good because of the high fiber content, which is very benefitial for your gastrointestinal system. A diet poor with high fiber products is also considered a risk factor for the developement of colon cancer. White meat has a high content of fat and cholesterol, and is also not very recommended to be eating a lot of.

More discussions about habit
References in periodicals archive ?
We drink for a variety of reasons--or in many cases, mechanically for no reason at all -- or unthinkingly from force of habit.