freudianism


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Related to freudianism: Freudian psychology

freudianism

[froi′dē·əniz′əm]
the school of psychiatry based on the psychoanalytic theories and psychotherapeutic methods of treating disorders developed by Sigmund Freud and his followers. Also called freudism. See also psychoanalysis.
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Chan skillfully integrates the I-Ching, the history of computer science, Freudianism, the scholarship of Donna Haraway, and the writing of Sadie Plant into a satisfying exploration of how Chinese conceptualizations of technology help reconfigure traditionally patriarchal assumptions about technology's origin and role in Western society.
Lacan combines Freudianism with the insights of structuralism and post-structuralism.
The name of Ernest Jones is not much heard these days, and yet he was as pivotal to the dissemination of psychoanalysis and Freudianism as T.
Freudianism comes in for more satire in "The True Religion" (1961; CP 90), which describes the inanity of the "transformation" from Christian faith to Freudian psychoanalysis, by means of which this "New Religion is the True,/ .
Unlike realism or feminism or scientific materialism, and to an even greater extent than Marxism and Freudianism, pessimism has collapsed.
That Peter Pan, the Alice books, and The Wonderful Wizard of Oz contain veiled elements of sexual awakening will surprise nobody remotely acquainted with the cracker-barrel Freudianism that has informed popular views of these books for decades.
The cartoonish, anti-Christian version of Western history has been out of favor with professional historians for some time, but it still shapes our perceptions and our language, much as Freudianism does.
With the decline of Marxism and Freudianism, many now point to neo-Darwinism as the dominant intellectual paradigm of the day, and many of those fight for or against the trend, mostly on religious grounds.
Here we have Michelangelo without Neoplatonism, without Freudianism, but surrounded by real and difficult people, grappling with problems both personal and political: Michelangelo as a working artist rather than as a legend from birth.
The Rainbow and Women in Love, for all their great qualities, too frequently descend into a low parody of Freudianism, and later books like The Plumed Serpent into a morass of Lawrentian cliches, but Sons and Lovers remains fresh, true to the reality of the young man--Paul Morel or Bert Lawrence--who lived it.
Neither Freudianism nor any purely existentialist consideration can heal these fundamental presuppositions.
Kimball deftly chronicles how artists such as Rothko, Sargent, Rubens, Homer, Gauguin, Van Gogh, and Velazquez have fallen victim to interpretations based on everything from sexism, racism, and feminism to Marxism and Freudianism.