frequency-dependent selection


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frequency-dependent selection

any SELECTION in which the FITNESS of genotypes is directly related to the proportions of the various PHENOTYPES present in a population, so that the frequency of the more common types is decreased and the less common types is increased. Such selection pressure often produces a stable GENETIC POLYMORPHISM and when it involves predation is referred to as APOSTATIC SELECTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Evolution under these conditions is called frequency-dependent selection.
2009) reported frequency-dependent selection by avian predators for the more common of the color morphs in P.
This occurred through frequency-dependent selection, where the fitness of one particular phenotype depended on the distribution of other phenotypes in the population.
Codon bias and frequency-dependent selection on the hemagglutinin epitopes of influenza A virus.
The causes for this change are discussed in relation to frequency-dependent selection and density/social stress hypotheses.
There are several mechanisms by which frequency-dependent selection might be achieved.
2) There may be pest-by-control-agent genotype interactions, leading to frequency-dependent selection, and a reduced overall rate of selective advance.
In the case of haploid organisms such as bacteria, balancing selection would take the form of frequency-dependent selection rather than overdominant selection.
Under these conditions, fecundity selection is expected to reinforce the frequency-dependent selection typical of SI systems, and this may lead to an increase in the number of alleles maintained in natural populations.
Various forms of frequency-dependent selection have long been hypothesized to maintain genetic polymorphisms in natural populations (Cain and Sheppard 1954, Fisher 1958, Haldane and Jayakar 1963, Ayala and Campbell 1974, Levin 1988, Hori 1993).
Negative frequency-dependent selection (rare advantage) is often implicated in the maintenance of genetic polymorphism (Clarke 1979).
Mean fitness is 1, but in each generation frequency-dependent selection tends to flatten the character distributions and hence to increase the phenotypic variance.

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