free drug

free drug

Unbound drug Pharmacology An active drug or other compound that is not bound to a carrier protein–eg, albumin or alpha-1-acid glycoprotein
References in periodicals archive ?
Ali Hajvery Free Drug Bank embodies the true spirit of public-private partnership in providing health services to needy patients.
UKPRwire, Tue Jan 09 2018] Needle Free Drug Delivery Devices Market is expected to experience a moderate growth in coming years between 2014 and 2022.
Needle free drug delivery technology provides effective drug delivery for wide range of drugs; it is bioequivalent to syringe and needle and results in less pain.
M2 PHARMA-June 6, 2016-Needle Free Drug Delivery Devices Market to Reach USD 14.
LAHORE -- Special Assistant to Chief Minister Punjab Khawaja Ahmed Hassan inaugurated second branch of Ali Hajveri Free Drug Bank at Lahore General Hospital here Saturday.
Further, substantial funding for free drugs is being provided to states that implement the National Health Mission - Free Drug Service Initiative.
One main marketing tool used by pharmaceutical representatives is the continued stock of free drug samples intended to be dispensed to patients on a limited basis.
Free drug samples not only do little to equalize medication access in the pediatric population, but they also may pose safety concerns in young patients, results of a recent study show.
Cutrona of Harvard Medical School, Boston, and her colleagues said the findings, which were based on nationally representative longitudinal survey data from 10,295 United States residents under age 18 years from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality 2004 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, show that free drug samples tend to go to children with the best access to health care, not to those with the greatest financial need.
Many physicians believe that free drug samples allow them to provide medication to their neediest patients, a claim often repeated by the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhARMA).
Poor and uninsured Americans are less likely than wealthy or insured Americans to receive free drug samples, according to a study by physicians from Cambridge Health Alliance and Harvard Medical School.
I agree that further study and hard evidence are needed to address the appropriateness of providing free drug samples in clinical care ("Free Drug Samples Create Ethical Rift Among MDs," Jan.