fratricide


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fratricide

(1) The killing of one’s sibling.
(2) A rarely used term for a person who commits fratricide.

fratricide

(frăt′rĭ-sīd″) [L. fratricidium]
Murder of one's brother or sister.
References in periodicals archive ?
military studies have found that so-called fratricide attacks by Afghan soldiers a including at least 39 from 2007 to 2011, according to a congressional inquiry a are usually carried out by soldiers angry at how their coalition counterparts treated them or Afghan civilians, or by insurgents who infiltrated the security forces.
The Human Factors of Fratricide is a scholarly work that seeks to apply a rigorously scientific and statistical methodology to the serious and growing problem of "friendly fire" within modern Western militaries.
The ENVGs provide Soldiers clearer night and day vision and faster threat recognition, which reduces collateral damage and fratricide.
Incidents of fratricide are a recurring horror in modern war.
Therefore, the listener should be prepared for a bloody story that includes violence and sex, fratricide, cannibalism, betrayal, murder, and other forms of brutality.
Adams returned to the United States and, as the first Vice President, was the first to discover that his fellow Founders had created "the most insignificant office ever known to man" Succeeding the irreplaceable Washington, President Adams fell victim to the political fratricide of the time.
The BOLT can facilitate this process by specifically tasking the IO in the appointing order to identify contributing factors to the fratricide.
In some 1,500 pages of White House e-mail messages and other documents about Corporal Tillman, there is not a single mention of fratricide.
We found out, months after that dusty April night, that what killed Pat Tillman in Afghanistan was not enemy fire, but fratricide, jargon for friendly fire, jargon for his fellow troops.
This book does not discuss the problem of fratricide, but this particular ambush seems to set the conditions for fratricide.
Mark Brown believes that "networking the battlefield" by providing infantry soldiers with high-tech tools to plug into the digital battle command network is a critical step toward increasing soldiers' lethality, while reducing the risk of death or injury, fratricide, and surprise enemy attacks.
The goal is to generate more timely actions and increase opportunities for the warfighter with less potential for fratricide.