frangible

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frangible

(fran′jĭ-bl) [Fr. fr L. frangere, to break]
Easily broken; fragile.
References in periodicals archive ?
The frangibility criteria applied to approach masts is also applied to wind direction indicators (wind cones), anemometers (automatic weather stations), localiser supports (if located within 984ft (300m) from the threshold), transmissometers (RVR) and forward-scatter meters (RVR).
Not surprisingly, proof of compliance with the frangibility rules must be verified and supplied to the aviation authority concerned.
For installations taller than 3ft 11 in, the frangibility must be proved via a full-scale dynamic impact test or computer analysis supported by a representative field test.
Light fittings, cabling and masts need be considered as a whole when establishing their frangibility.
All existing structures within 984ft (300m) of the end of the runway which fail to meet the frangibility requirement, (such as existing non-frangible ILS localizer antenna arrays), need to be replaced by a frangible structure, or relocated outside this distance.
GP towers are so tall that it is impossible to apply the same frangibility criteria used for approach light structures.
Despite all the new frangibility rules, as of November 23, 2006, Annex 14 ruled that a mandatory "fence or other suitable barrier" be used to deter unauthorised people from entering a non-public area of the aerodrome.
ICAO focuses on the frangibility and safety of structures at airports in Annex 14 of the Aerodrome Design Manual.
The Lattix masts are equipped with a patent-pending breakaway mechanism, which combines with the energy absorbing characteristics of the material and construction method, providing excellent frangibility characteristics, claims the company.
The latest delivery means that four out of the airport's five approaches have now been upgraded to meet new approach mast frangibility requirements.
The last 12 months also saw two major new airports, Hong Kong International and Oslo Gardermoen, together with the likes of Brussels, Sydney and a host of smaller airports, join a forward looking group that has anticipated ICAO's 2005 frangibility ruling for approach light masts.
Frangibility is a built-in feature of Exel's masts and no break-away points are needed, claims the company.