fragility fracture


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fragility fracture

A fracture that occurs in a bone weakened by osteoporosis.
See also: fracture
References in periodicals archive ?
3,9,10) The estimated economic toll of osteoporosis related fragility fractures in West Virginia was reported in this Journal with current screening and treatment protocols providing minimal cost savings for our state.
The World Health Organization (WHO) and, more recently the National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF), indicate that factors other than BMD, including age >65 years, AI use, smoking and previous fragility fracture, should be taken into account when managing bone health in postmenopausal women.
Although frequent falls and low bone mass are both important determinants of fragility fractures, the risk of falling is thought to be the more important factor in older adults [22].
00) and a 35% higher incidence of fragility fractures (pooled IRR 1.
Low CD4 count is associated with an increased risk of fragility fracture in HIV-infected patients.
Again, white race, lower body mass index, an alcohol-related diagnosis, use of a proton-pump inhibitor, and use of a corticosteroid made a Fragility fracture more likely.
In most countries less than half of women and men who sustain a fragility fracture have osteoporosis as diagnosed by DEXA measurements of BMD.
At age 50, up to one in two women and one in five men will go on to suffer a fragility fracture in their lifetimes.
People with osteoporosis have a high risk of fragility fractures, which are fractures that occur from slight trauma (for example, not in a car accident) and generally result from low bone density.
14) Identifying individuals with structural deterioration of bone may help us make more informed treatment decisions particularly in the younger postmenopausal with a low bone density on DEXA scanning, but no history of fragility fracture.
One-half of all women and one-third of all men will sustain a fragility fracture in their lifetime.
Studies have shown that anyone age 50 or older who suffers a fragility fracture - a bone break sustained in a fall from a standing height or less - is two to five times more likely to experience a second fracture than someone who hasn't had one.