fractionation


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fractionation

 [frak″shun-a´shun]
1. in radiology, division of the total dose of radiation into small doses given at intervals.
2. in chemistry, separation of a substance into components, as by distillation or crystallization.
3. in histology, isolation of components of living cells by differential centrifugation.

frac·tion·a·tion

(frak'shŭn-ā'shŭn),
1. To separate components of a mixture.
2. The administration of a course of therapeutic radiation of a neoplasm in a planned series of fractions of the total dose, most often once a day for several weeks, in order to minimize radiation damage of contiguous normal tissues.

fractionation

/frac·tion·a·tion/ (frak″shun-a´shun)
1. in radiology, division of the total dose of radiation into small doses administered at intervals.
2. in chemistry, separation of a substance into components, as by distillation or crystallization.
3. in histology, isolation of components of living cells by differential centrifugation.

fractionation

(frăk′shə-nā′shən)
n.
1. The process of dividing or separating into parts; breaking up.
2. The division of a total therapeutic dose of radiation into small doses to be administered over a period of days or weeks.
3. The separation of a chemical compound into components, as by distillation.

fractionation

[frak′shənā′shən]
Etymology: L, frangere, to break
1 (in neurology) a mechanism within the neural arch of the vertebrae whereby only a portion of the efferent nerves innervating a muscle reacts to a stimulus, even when the reflex requirement is maximal, so that a reserve of neurons remains to respond to additional stimuli. Through this phenomenon muscle tension is maintained.
2 (in chemistry) the separation of a substance into its basic constituents by using such procedures as fractional distillation or crystallization.
3 (in bacteriology) the process of isolating a pure culture by successive culturing of a small portion of a colony of bacteria.
4 (in histology) the process of isolating the different components of living cells by centrifugation.
5 (in radiology) the process of administering a dose of radiation in smaller units over time to minimize tissue damage rather than in a single large dose. also called dose fractionation.

fractionation

Radiation oncology The parceling of a dose of radiation over time. See Accelerated fractionation, Hyperfractionation, Radiation therpy.

frac·tion·a·tion

(frakshŭn-āshŭn)
1. Separation of the components of a mixture into its basic constituents.
2. The administration of a course of therapeutic radiation in a planned series of fractions of the total dose, most often once a day for several weeks, to minimize radiation damage of contiguous normal tissues.

Fractionation

A laboratory test or process in which blood or another fluid is broken down into its components. Fractionation can be used to assess the proportions of the different types of cholesterol in a blood sample.

frac·tion·a·tion

(frakshŭn-āshŭn)
1. Separation of the components of a mixture into its basic constituents.
2. The administration of a course of therapeutic radiation of a neoplasm in a planned series of fractions of the total dose, most often once a day for several weeks, to minimize radiation damage.

fractionation

(frak´shənā´shən),
n 1. the separation of a substance into its basic constituents.
2. the process of isolating a pure culture by sucessive culturing of a small portion of a colony of bacteria.
3. the process of isolating different components of living cells by centrifugation.
4. the process of administering a dose of radiation in smaller units over time to minimize tissue damage.

fractionation

1. in radiotherapy, division of the total dose of radiation into small doses given at intervals.
2. in chemistry, separation of a substance into components, as by distillation or crystallization.
3. in histology, isolation of components of living cells by differential centrifugation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fractionation units are used to separate mixtures of extracted NGLs into individual pure components.
is a master limited partnership that provides natural gas gathering, processing, treating, compression and transportation services and NGL fractionation and transportation services for its producer customers.
These protein products, which are purified from plasma by a process known as fractionation, are used to treat a wide variety of serious and often life-threatening conditions such as shock, trauma, infections, immunological disorders, Hemophilia A and B, and other blood disorders.
The plant will also serve as a model for the future construction of another fractionation plant in the US (San Marcos, Texas) due to start in 2014, and delivering a maximum capacity of 4 million litres.
Equation 4 is valid to quantify the fractionation between the substrate ONtot and an instantaneous product [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], with no changes in both [delta](sup.
Fractionation is the process by which important products for petrochemical industries are separated from natural gas and then prepared for shipment to a variety of users.
Khullar explained that in the dry fractionation method, the kernel is crushed, flattening out the germ.
Noted Rene Steiner, president of Buhler, "We feel it is extremely important to develop fractionation with the ethanol industry, for the ethanol industry and working with Ethanex allows us to do just that.
The key sub-processes in the recycled fiber lines include OptiSlush[TM] pulping, detrashing, cleaning, OptiScreen[TM] coarse screening, LC cleaning, fractionation and fine screening, thickening, OptiFiner[TM] dispersion and engineering services.
Broin Companies recently unveiled its new bio-refining technology, dubbed Broin Fractionation (BFrac), during the Fuel Ethanol Workshop (FEW) in Kansas City, MO.
Such an honest introduction made me look forward to what was coming--isotopic fractionation amongst black and white cats, elemental fractionation between cats and dogs, advection and diffusion of fish in rivers, and chromatography amongst a parade of people on a hot day.
In some cases, fractionation prior to the mass spectrometric analysis was shown to be very effective for increasing the number of proteins and metabolites that could be identified, and further development in fractionation methodologies could perhaps be the key for the identification of novel biomarkers.