foxglove

(redirected from foxgloves)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Digitalis

(dij'i-tal'is, -ta'lis),
A genus of perennial flowering plants of the family Schrophulariaceae. Digitalis lanata, a European species, and Digitalis purpurea, purple foxglove, are the main sources of cardioactive steroid glycosides used in the treatment of certain heart diseases, especially congestive heart failure; also used to treat tachyarrhythmias of atrial origin.
Synonym(s): foxglove
[L. digitalis, relating to the fingers; in allusion to the fingerlike flowers]

foxglove

(fŏks′glŭv′)
n.
Any of several herbs of the genus Digitalis, especially D. purpurea of Europe and northern Africa, having a long cluster of large, tubular, pinkish-purple flowers and leaves that are the source of the drug digitalis. Also called digitalis.

foxglove

[foks′glov]
the common name for Digitalis purpura, the plant that is a source of digitalis, a powerful cardiac stimulant.
Herbal medicine A biennial herb that contains the prototypic cardioactive glycoside, digitalis, gitaloxin, gitoxin; it is no longer administered as an herb, given its cardiotoxicity
Toxicity Anorexia, drowsiness, impaired vision, nausea, and vomiting; when the intoxication is extreme, tachyarrhythmias, ventricular fibrillation, cardiovascular collapse, possibly death
Homeopathy See Digitalis

Di·gi·ta·lis

(dij'i-tā'lis)
A perennial flowering plant that is the main source for some cardioactive steroid glycosides useful in therapy for coronary heart failure and other cardiac disease.
Synonym(s): foxglove.
[L. digitalis, relating to the fingers; in allusion to the fingerlike flowers]
Enlarge picture
FOXGLOVE: Springtime appearance before the plant flowers

foxglove

(fŏks′glŏv)
The common name for the flowering plant Digitalis purpurea, from which digitalis is obtained.
See: illustration

foxglove

digitalispurpurea.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another resident said they heard sirens and saw several armed police vehicles on the junction of Foxgloves and Bonnygrove Way.
Most people know that foxglove is used in medicine, but foxglove heals plants as well as people.
Foxglove digitalis purpurea, (Bysedd y Cwn in Welsh, which translates as Dog Fingers) is native to the British Isles and grows in the open on disturbed soils.
He successfully identified the active ingredient (now called digitalis) as being derived from foxgloves and after nine years' study published 'An Account of the Foxglove and Some of Its Medical Uses'.
You can also grow foxgloves as a bedding plant with first year flowering F1 hybrids dalmatian and camelot.
In the United States, the foxglove is cultivated both as a medicinal herb and as an ornamental flowering plant.
Digitalis is still one of the most important heart medicines and has not been synthesized but is made from the leaves of foxgloves specially grown to regulate the amount of digitalis in the plant.
This pretty hybrid combines the purple shades of our native foxgloves with the warm orangey colours and jagged petals of Isoplexis.
Foxgloves were also a major feature of the beautiful, gold medal-winning display mounted by The Botanic Nursery from Atworth, Wiltshire.
NATIVE foxgloves can grow up to 5ft tall and they offer a new dimension to any part of the garden - both in sun and shade.
With modern farming practices continuing to disturb the bees' natural habitats, Barratt Mercia is taking the initiative by planting honeysuckles, foxgloves, poppies, lavenders and catmint around its new homes.