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Digitalis

(dij'i-tal'is, -ta'lis),
A genus of perennial flowering plants of the family Schrophulariaceae. Digitalis lanata, a European species, and Digitalis purpurea, purple foxglove, are the main sources of cardioactive steroid glycosides used in the treatment of certain heart diseases, especially congestive heart failure; also used to treat tachyarrhythmias of atrial origin.
Synonym(s): foxglove
[L. digitalis, relating to the fingers; in allusion to the fingerlike flowers]

foxglove

(fŏks′glŭv′)
n.
Any of several herbs of the genus Digitalis, especially D. purpurea of Europe and northern Africa, having a long cluster of large, tubular, pinkish-purple flowers and leaves that are the source of the drug digitalis. Also called digitalis.

foxglove

[foks′glov]
the common name for Digitalis purpura, the plant that is a source of digitalis, a powerful cardiac stimulant.
Herbal medicine A biennial herb that contains the prototypic cardioactive glycoside, digitalis, gitaloxin, gitoxin; it is no longer administered as an herb, given its cardiotoxicity
Toxicity Anorexia, drowsiness, impaired vision, nausea, and vomiting; when the intoxication is extreme, tachyarrhythmias, ventricular fibrillation, cardiovascular collapse, possibly death
Homeopathy See Digitalis

Di·gi·ta·lis

(dij'i-tā'lis)
A perennial flowering plant that is the main source for some cardioactive steroid glycosides useful in therapy for coronary heart failure and other cardiac disease.
Synonym(s): foxglove.
[L. digitalis, relating to the fingers; in allusion to the fingerlike flowers]
Enlarge picture
FOXGLOVE: Springtime appearance before the plant flowers

foxglove

(fŏks′glŏv)
The common name for the flowering plant Digitalis purpurea, from which digitalis is obtained.
See: illustration

foxglove

digitalispurpurea.
References in periodicals archive ?
The display of foxgloves in the gardens of Plan Tan y Bwlch in Snowdonia National Park
New varieties under the name orchid foxgloves have flower funnels consisting of four tubular petals, curving inwards to give a frilled look.
Because foxgloves grow tall, they are usually planted in groups as a background to a flower border.
She spotted a rogue pink foxglove in her border the other day and pulled it out in disgust.
ADIGOXIN is an extract of the European foxglove, which was discovered by William Withering, a famous Birmingham physician and botanist.
Foxgloves also like moist soil conditions and let's face it, we've had loads of that
Foxgloves have a particular association with Birmingham through the work of the 18th century physician and botanist William Withering.
Expert tip: One of the best things about growing foxgloves is that they will readily self-sow for the following year.
Tall plants such as foxgloves and hollyhocks are also popular with bees.
Barratt West Midlands has been moved by the insects' plight and have started landscaping round its new homes with "bee friendly" plants like honeysuckle, foxglove, poppy, lavender and catmint.
Plant spring-flowering biennials including wallflowers, sweet Williams, forget-me-nots and foxgloves.
Delphiniums, foxgloves, hollyhocks, and verbascum provide the perfect accents, punctuating beds and borders with statuesque candles of bloom.