foxglove


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Digitalis

(dij'i-tal'is, -ta'lis),
A genus of perennial flowering plants of the family Schrophulariaceae. Digitalis lanata, a European species, and Digitalis purpurea, purple foxglove, are the main sources of cardioactive steroid glycosides used in the treatment of certain heart diseases, especially congestive heart failure; also used to treat tachyarrhythmias of atrial origin.
Synonym(s): foxglove
[L. digitalis, relating to the fingers; in allusion to the fingerlike flowers]

foxglove

(fŏks′glŭv′)
n.
Any of several herbs of the genus Digitalis, especially D. purpurea of Europe and northern Africa, having a long cluster of large, tubular, pinkish-purple flowers and leaves that are the source of the drug digitalis. Also called digitalis.

foxglove

[foks′glov]
the common name for Digitalis purpura, the plant that is a source of digitalis, a powerful cardiac stimulant.
Herbal medicine A biennial herb that contains the prototypic cardioactive glycoside, digitalis, gitaloxin, gitoxin; it is no longer administered as an herb, given its cardiotoxicity
Toxicity Anorexia, drowsiness, impaired vision, nausea, and vomiting; when the intoxication is extreme, tachyarrhythmias, ventricular fibrillation, cardiovascular collapse, possibly death
Homeopathy See Digitalis

Di·gi·ta·lis

(dij'i-tā'lis)
A perennial flowering plant that is the main source for some cardioactive steroid glycosides useful in therapy for coronary heart failure and other cardiac disease.
Synonym(s): foxglove.
[L. digitalis, relating to the fingers; in allusion to the fingerlike flowers]
Enlarge picture
FOXGLOVE: Springtime appearance before the plant flowers

foxglove

(fŏks′glŏv)
The common name for the flowering plant Digitalis purpurea, from which digitalis is obtained.
See: illustration

foxglove

digitalispurpurea.
References in periodicals archive ?
Foxgloves also produce a huge amount of seeds - apparently around 80,000 seeds per ounce, so I am expecting an even better display next year, but hope the local fox doesn't find out
The drink's look and feel needs to match the glamorous interior of Foxglove, so the glass shows curved lines in much the same way as the design of the bar.
The display of foxgloves in the gardens of Plan Tan y Bwlch in Snowdonia National Park
In an article published online June 14 in Molecular Pharmacology, researchers at the University of Michigan Health System reveal that digoxin, the active ingredient in digitalis, or the poisonous plant Foxglove, can enhance the body's own protective mechanism against high blood pressure and heart failure.
There are pretty white bush geraniums in some wooden troughs in a shady corner which have flowered well despite the lack of sunshine, while her borders are peppered with white foxgloves, white roses and tall, scented tobacco plants, Nicotiana sylvestris.
This always troubled me as a child, all the fairies I knew, real or imagined were far too small to use the foxglove flowers as mittens.
Maybe some strains are, says Damsteegt, but for soybeans, the Japanese biotype (or subspecies) of the foxglove aphid may be more exotic than the virus it transmits.
His first novel, The Foxglove Saga (1960), is a satire on Catholic boarding schools and the British army.
Popular biennials include Canterbury Bells, common foxglove, Sweet William and other beautiful blooms.
Julia, via email ATRY Papa sut the foxglove or common poppy.
Some seeds, such as astrantia, foxglove, angelica, aquilegia, meconopsis, primula, delphinium and orlaya, can be planted straight away.