foxglove


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Digitalis

(dij'i-tal'is, -ta'lis),
A genus of perennial flowering plants of the family Schrophulariaceae. Digitalis lanata, a European species, and Digitalis purpurea, purple foxglove, are the main sources of cardioactive steroid glycosides used in the treatment of certain heart diseases, especially congestive heart failure; also used to treat tachyarrhythmias of atrial origin.
Synonym(s): foxglove
[L. digitalis, relating to the fingers; in allusion to the fingerlike flowers]

foxglove

(fŏks′glŭv′)
n.
Any of several herbs of the genus Digitalis, especially D. purpurea of Europe and northern Africa, having a long cluster of large, tubular, pinkish-purple flowers and leaves that are the source of the drug digitalis. Also called digitalis.

foxglove

[foks′glov]
the common name for Digitalis purpura, the plant that is a source of digitalis, a powerful cardiac stimulant.
Herbal medicine A biennial herb that contains the prototypic cardioactive glycoside, digitalis, gitaloxin, gitoxin; it is no longer administered as an herb, given its cardiotoxicity
Toxicity Anorexia, drowsiness, impaired vision, nausea, and vomiting; when the intoxication is extreme, tachyarrhythmias, ventricular fibrillation, cardiovascular collapse, possibly death
Homeopathy See Digitalis

Di·gi·ta·lis

(dij'i-tā'lis)
A perennial flowering plant that is the main source for some cardioactive steroid glycosides useful in therapy for coronary heart failure and other cardiac disease.
Synonym(s): foxglove.
[L. digitalis, relating to the fingers; in allusion to the fingerlike flowers]
Enlarge picture
FOXGLOVE: Springtime appearance before the plant flowers

foxglove

(fŏks′glŏv)
The common name for the flowering plant Digitalis purpurea, from which digitalis is obtained.
See: illustration

foxglove

digitalispurpurea.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example foxglove, from which the heart drug digoxin is made, yew from which chemotherapy drugs were developed, and St John's Wort, the antidepressant.
But the display is likely to be short-lived with foxgloves fading by the end of June.
Blooms in colors from apricot to magenta top a mound of velvety leaves that are less prone to rust than standard foxglove.
Since the 13th century, the herb and poisonous plant Foxglove has been used to cleanse wounds and its dried leaves were carefully brewed by Native Americans to treat leg swelling caused by heart problems.
Fuchs first applied the term digitus to the foxglove in his herbal De Historia Stirpium, published in 1542.
There are pretty white bush geraniums in some wooden troughs in a shady corner which have flowered well despite the lack of sunshine, while her borders are peppered with white foxgloves, white roses and tall, scented tobacco plants, Nicotiana sylvestris.
Maybe some strains are, says Damsteegt, but for soybeans, the Japanese biotype (or subspecies) of the foxglove aphid may be more exotic than the virus it transmits.
DIGITALIS PURPUREA FOXGLOVE The staple of any cottage garden is the common foxglove - stately spires of purple or white tubular blooms.
Allen, 73, of Foxglove Avenue in Needham Market near Ipswich, denies a total of 40 charges of indecent assault and other sexual offences against 19 boys and one girl between 1968 and 1991.
The late Peter Whittle, who owned the house in Foxglove Road, Almondbury, so loved the tree when it was in blossom that he snapped up the large detached property when it came on the MARKET.
Andrew Gillingham's grandson Calib with the giant foxglove
BEST OF THE BUNCH Digitalis Illumination Pink AFTER the excitement of the RHS Chelsea Flower Show, it's likely gardeners will be scrambling to grow the tropical-looking foxglove, Digitalis Illumination Pink, winner of this year's RHS Chelsea Plant of the Year award.