squirrel

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Related to fox squirrel: black squirrel

squirrel

small, arboreal, mostly herbivorous rodents varying in color from gray to shiny black, red and cream, and in size from mouse to large cat. Some are insectivorous, and many are terrestrial, e.g. the chipmunks. Some glide although they are called flying squirrels. Most squirrels are diurnal but the flying genera are nocturnal. They are all members of the family Sciuridae, which includes a very large number of species, and are distinguished by their fine, dense fur and their bushy, plume-like tails and ears that are often surmounted by tufts of hair.

squirrel corn
dicentracanadensis.
squirrel fibroma
a poxvirus disease caused by a member of the genus Leporipoxvirus in which there are typical subcutaneous fibroma lesions. The virus isolated from the lesions has been used to produce fibroma lesions in rabbits.
fox squirrel
this species has a characteristic of inherited porphyria manifested by fluorescence of bones and teeth when viewed under ultraviolet light, and a pink coloration of these and other tissues. There is no photosensitization. Called also Sciurus spp.
squirrel monkey
a dramatically colored, e.g. yellow-green with red lower limbs, squirrel-sized, carnivorous monkey distinguished by its large brain. Called also Saimiri sciureus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Response of fox squirrels and eastern gray squirrels to a late spring-early summer food shortage.
Chincoteague NWR in Virginia and Prime Hook NWR in Delaware both host translocated Delmarva fox squirrel populations.
Gray squirrels are most active during the early morning and evening, while fox squirrels often travel during mid-day.
National Wildlife Refuges, such as Chincoteague NWR in Virginia, have been instrumental in providing habitat and contributing to the knowledge of Delmarva fox squirrels (Sciurus niger cinereus).
The positive relationship between abundant food resources and litter or clutch sizes or number of litters per female per breeding season (1 versus 2) has been demonstrated for a variety of species including other sciurids such as gray and fox squirrels (Nixon and Donohoe 1975) and eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) (Yahner and Svendsen 1978) in eastern hardwood forests.
The eastern fox squirrel (Sciurus niger) has generally remained restricted to areas of human habitation throughout southern California since its introduction into Los Angeles in 1904 (Becker and Kimball 1947; King 2004).
The fox squirrel (Sciurus niger), is the common tree squirrel at Willow Slough.
When the early morning sun gilded the oak-tree covered hillside with it's golden light I watched in delight as a P&Y sized fox squirrel exited his den hole seventy five yards from my stand and started working his way through the frost bared limbs.
The unusual dark pink to dull reddish hue of the skull and post-cranial skeleton of specimens of the fox squirrel (Sciurus niger) is a distinctive feature that has long been noted by naturalists and has even been used by some biologists (Jones et al.
Mammals include the California ground squirrel, black-tailed jack rabbit, desert cottontail, fox squirrel, Brazilian free-tailed bat and raccoon.
A few mammals, especially the fox squirrel, eat the fruit.