fowl


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Related to fowl: fowl cholera

fowl

(foul)
n. pl. fowl or fowls
1. Any of various birds of the order Galliformes, especially the common, widely domesticated chicken (Gallus domesticus).
2.
a. A bird, such as a duck, goose, turkey, or pheasant, that is used as food or hunted as game.
b. The flesh of such birds used as food.
3. A bird of any kind.

fowl′er n.

fowl

domestic fowl. A member of the genus Gallus of the family Phasianidae, the pheasant family. Characterized by a fleshy comb, earlobes below the eyes and wattles from below the beak, long, drooping hackle feathers on the neck of the cock, pendent, lancet-shaped covert feathers on the wings, upward curving sickle feathers in the tail of the male, jointed spurs on the legs of the cock bird and well-marked sexual dimorphism.
There are many breeds of domestic fowl but they have diminished in importance with the expansion of the broiler and egg industries, most enterprises carrying their own genetic strains identified by code numbers. Some of the more common breeds are identified under the headings: brahma, cochin, cornish, english game, langshan, minorca, orpington (Buff and Black), plymouth rock, rhode island red, silkie, sussex, white leghorn, wyandotte and many breeds of bantam.
For most entries relating to fowls see under avian.

fowl cholera
a contagious widespread disease of fowls caused by Pasteurella multocida and manifested by septicemia with sudden onset, rapid spread, short course and high mortality. There may be diarrhea and dyspnea.
fowl coryza
a serious, widespread, respiratory disease of fowls caused by Avibacteriumparagallinarum and characterized by acute inflammation of the upper respiratory tract and air sacs. It is characterized by an acute onset of mucoid or serous nasal discharge, facial edema and conjunctivitis, swollen wattles, diarrhea, reduced feed intake and a heavy culling rate.
fowl manna grass
glyceriastriata.
fowl paralysis
fowl paratyphoid
an important cause of wastage in commercial birds, especially turkeys occurring as outbreaks of severe enteritis in young birds caused by Salmonella spp. including over 100 species.
fowl pest
fowl plague
see avian influenza.
fowl pox
see fowlpox.
fowl tick
see argaspersicus.
fowl typhoid
a disease of fowl and turkeys caused by Salmonella gallinarum. It affects only adult hens and is rare in modern, hygienically managed commercial flocks. There is weakness, diarrhea and anemia. The course is short and case mortality is high.
References in classic literature ?
If agreeable to you," he observed, "it would give me pleasure to turn over these flowers, and those ancient and respectable fowls, to your care.
Porthos ate his wing of the fowl timidly, and shuddered when he felt the knee of the procurator's wife under the table, as it came in search of his.
Coquenard had eaten his soup, the black feet of the fowl, and the only mutton bone on which there was the least appearance of meat.
Yet I saw abundance of fowls, but knew not their kinds; neither when I killed them could I tell what was fit for food, and what not.
These fowls, of which I have seen many, are very tame, and when they are pursued, stretch out their wings, and run with amazing swiftness.
Quebec and Malta lay the cloth for dinner, while Woolwich, serving, as beseems him, under his father, keeps the fowls revolving.
Bagnet shows her white teeth cheerfully, but to the perception of her son, betrays so much uneasiness of spirit that he is impelled by the dictates of affection to ask her, with his eyes, what is the matter, thus standing, with his eyes wide open, more oblivious of the fowls than before, and not affording the least hope of a return to consciousness.
That, of course, came first (incorrectly); and it reminded me of my thirst, which the blood of the fowls had so very partially appeased.
I'll buy some fowls from Farmer Brown," said she, "and they will lay eggs each morning, which I will sell to the parson's wife.
Now don't commit any of your usual blunders, by telling him the fire's out, and the fowls alive.
Of course, all sorts of depredators visited the place from time to time: foxes and gipsies wrought havoc in the night; while in the daytime, I regret to have to confess that visits from the Rugby boys, and consequent disappearances of ancient and respectable fowls were not unfrequent.
It was the family custom when the day recurred, to sacrifice a pair of fowls on the altar of Hymen; and Bella had sent a note beforehand, to intimate that she would bring the votive offering with her.